Shikoku Pilgrimage 2016 by Garyo, 31

 

 

Tamura Jinja and the Ritsurin Garden (temple 84)

 

 

It is estimated that there are around 100, 000 Jinjas (Shinto Shrines) in Japan.

Shinto means “way of the Gods.” Originally, the sun, the moon, mountains, trees

rocks, waterfalls, etc. were worshiped as gods or spiritual beings – spirits living

in them. Kamis were worshiped to ensure good harvests, prosperous life, etc.

One of the most fascinating Jinja’s I visited on my pilgrimage was the Tamura Jinja,

Ichinomiya (temple 83), the First Shrine in Sanuki Province now Takamatsu City.

 

 

 

 

 

 

A huge Torii (gate) at the entrance of the shrine symbolizes the transition from

profane to sacred ground. Torii means literally bird’s abode. In Japan, birds are

thought to have connections to the dead. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hotei, god of contentment and happiness, is one of seven Gods of Good Fortune

(sometimes, identified as Miroku Bosatsu, Maitreya Bodhisattva, Future Buddha,

Bodhisattva of Friendship) at the entrance of the shrine.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Many Torii’ are indicating the sacredness of the place (sometimes donated with

donors’ names).

 

 

 

 

 

 

The building, called Haiden (lit. player building, for the visitors to pray to the

the enshrined kami of the shrine.  Behind  this building stands Honden (lit. main

building), which is not accessible to the public.  The ritual in front of the Honden,

after cleaning hands and mouth, includes bowing, donating money, bowing twice,

clapping the hands twice, and bowing once (called ni-rei, ni-hakushu ichi-rei).

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Ox is dedicated to students.  If a student wants to pass an exam, the student first

has to turn the golden ball in the mouth of the ox, then crawl underneath a hole

under the sculpture and finally pray at a specific spot.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Many sculptures of dragons can be seen in Tamura Jinja.  Dragons are large,

wingless (unlike Western counterparts) and serpentine mythological creatures

associated with rainfall and bodies of water.  Unfortunately, I did not know much

about them, except that I loved these creatures (Eastern dragons may be more

benevolent than Western ones in relation to humans).

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dragon with Nyoi-shu, Wishi-fulfilling Gem

 

 

 

 

 

 

Torii with dragon and Shimenawa

 

 

Besides celebrating Matsuri (big public festivals), purification rituals for different

stages of life (birth, wedding…..) are performed. The photo below shows a ritual for

a new car to ensure safety and good luck.

 

 

 

 

The city of Takamatsu is also famous for the Ritsurin Garden, one of the most famous

historical gardens in Japan. Typical for Japanese gardens, every step I took provided

another beautiful view of the scenery. The Garden is located near the Shikoku-no-

michi, the Ohenro walking route.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Lake surrounded by black pines in the Ritsurin garden

 

 

 

 

 

 

Interesting bridge

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hako-matsu Pine trees (translated as box shaped pine).  The formation is achieved

by meticulous pruning methods. The scenery created by these pines is unique in the

world.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This black pine tree is one of the most beautiful pine trees in the garden. It

symbolizes a white crane spreading its wings on an enormous tortoise back (rock

symbolizes the tortoise). The Tsuru-Kame-Matsu (Crane-Tortoise-Pine Tree) stands

for longivity. It is said that cranes live for one thousand years and tortoise for ten

thousand years. This tortoise composed of some one hundred rocks.

 

 

 

 

 

Wisteria trellis

 

 

 

 

 

 

White Wisteria in full bloom

 

 

 

 

 

 

Lady in Kimono in the Ritsurin garden

.

.

.

Posted in Shikoku (Four States or Provinces) | Leave a comment

Shikoku Pilgrimage 2016 by Garyo, 30

 

 

 

Waraji, the traditional shoes of pilgrims and travelers (temples 81,82,83)

 

 

The walk up to the Shiromineji (temple 81), called also the temple of the white peak,

was very beautiful. The temple is located on a mountain plateau called Goshiki-dai

(five-colored-grounds).   Shiromine (white peak), Kimine(yellow peak), Akamine

(red peak), Aomine (blue peak) and Kuromini (black peak).

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ishi-dōrō (stone lantern) on the way to Shiromineji

 

 

Like many other temples of the Shikoku-no-michi, Path of Shikoku, Kūkai originally

founded temple 81. One of the emperors of the Chrysanthemum throne, Emperor

Sutoku (12th century), has a mausoleum and memorial here. The memorial is called

Tonshouji.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Shiromineji

 

 

 

 

 

 

Many temples and shrines have donation stones with the inscription of the donor’s

name – like the line of stone tablets along the stairs in the photo above.

 

 

 

 

 

 

The stone is a typical path marker.  In this case, the hand pointing to the left says

Negoroji (temple 82).  The hand pointing the right points in the direction of

Shiromineji (temple 81)

 

On the walk to Negoroji (temple 82), I met Ella, a French pilgrim.  We got along well

and spent the next couple of days together.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ella admiring the spring blossoms

 

 

The middle of April was a great time to hike. Spring was everywhere. Wisterias, a

protected plant in the Kagawa prefecture, were starting to bloom.  Every year from

April 26 – May 5, the Wisteria Festival is celebrated in Kagawa.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Six feet tall Kujaku-Fuji (Peacock wisteria) with a small Shinto shrine

 

 

Negoroji (temple 82) is also located on the same mountain plateau, but on the blue

peak mountain Aomine.

 

At the entrance, two enormous straw sandals called Waraji are exhibited in front of

the temple gate. This is not unusual. The huge sandals are there to trick evil spirits

into staying out of the temple ground by making them believe that the shoes belong

to giant guardians of the temple. Little sandals are often attached to the wooden

fences of the gate. In the old days, these Waraji were the traditional shoes Japanese

pilgrims wore on their pilgrimage. They only lasted for 24 hours. Foot problems are

the most common problems on a walking pilgrimage.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Huge Waraji with little straw sandals attached

 

 

 

 

 

 

Vegetation in Negoroji 

 

 

Ichinomiyaji (temple 83), called the temple of the First Shrine, had two interesting

sculptures.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Two Ohenros reading the tablet inside the sculpture of a lotus bud –

the Heart Sutra, Ohenros chant at each temple

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

There was also a shrine dedicated to Yakushi Nyorai, the Healing Buddha.  During

Taiho Period (701-704 C.E.), Ichinomiya-ji (temple 83) was built connected with the

Tamura-jinja or Sanuki Ichinomiya (1st Shrine), and separated later, like many other

temples and shrines. The stone is probably a left over from this connection. It is told

that Kōbō Daishi built this shrine to warn people of the boiling sounds of the Hell

Kettle to wake up. If wrong-doing people put their heads in, the door shuts up and

catches them. Legend tells that one time an old woman with the name O-tane, Seed,

did not believe in it and tried to put her head in and was caught by her head hearing

the boiling sounds.  She repented the wrong doings, the door opened and let her

free.  She awakened. The story of the roaring sounds of fire might be rooted in the

volcanic activities in Japan.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

.

.

.

Posted in Shikoku (Four States or Provinces) | Leave a comment

Shikoku Pilgrimage 2016 by Garyo, 29

 

 

 

Kannon and the beauty of detail (temples 76 – 79)

 

 

The soil in the Kagawa prefecture contains a lot of clay and is not good for growing

rice.  However, the soil is very suited for growing wheat. Therefore, wheat noodles

(udon) are the most famous dish in this area.

 

 

 

 

 

 

All over Shikoku, I saw people working in their gardens.  They always focused on tiny

areas, weeding with utter carefulness, even when the surrounding area was ugly.  I

loved their love for detail! Also, people working outside always wore hats and gloves.

They do not like the skin becoming brown.

 

 

 

 

 

 

The love for detail I especially could see in temples and shrines.  The sense for beauty

and aesthetics was stunning.  Gōshōji (temple 78) was one of the temples I especially

liked.

 

 

 

 

 

Walkway to the Daishi hall with gorgeous floral ceiling reliefs

 

 

 

 

 

 

Beside the Daishi hall in Gōshōji, a stairway leads to the entrance of an underground

hall (Mantai Kannon Dō, Ten-thousand Kannon Hall) dedicated to Kannon, the

Bosatsu of Compassion.  Kannon is the translationof Avalokita-svara, Observing-

sounds (of cries), or Avolokita-īśvara, Observing-omnipotent (in responding). 

Thousands of little Kannon statues are lined up all along the wall.  I was told that the

temple was dedicated to dead children.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

In addition to the statues, many little toys were given as offerings to Kannon.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Garden of Gōshōji

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Kokubunji (temple 80) is the fourth temple on the 88 temple pilgrimage carrying the

same name.Kokubunji means province temple, which was built in each province

according to the decree of Emperor Shomu in 741 C.E. .  In each of the four provinces

of Shikoku, there exists a temple called Kokubunji.

 

The temple contains a jōroku,16 feet tall, Senju-kannon, One-thousand-handed

Kannon, the tallest one of the Shikoku pilgrimage.  It is kept out of sight from the

public and is considered a Hibutsu, a secret or hidden Buddha.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Fudōmyō-ō, the Unmovable (Acala) with the pagoda in the background

.

.

.

Posted in Shikoku (Four States or Provinces) | Leave a comment

Shikoku Pilgrimage 2016 by Garyo, 28

 

 

 

From Iyadaniji  to  Zentsūji (temples 71 – 75)

 

 

 

Iyadaniji (temple 71) is nestled against steep, vertical cliffs.  The temple is famous for

the faces of Amida Buddha and his attendants carved into the rock. It is told that, in

this temple, many miracles happened in the past (crutches left behind can be seen).

I climbed up to the top of the hill and had a gorgeous view down to Mitoyo City.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Bus Ohenros washing hands and mouth before entering the temple grounds

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cave with water basin in front of the Buddha, wooden donation sticks, 

ishi-dōrō (stone lantern) and statues of Jizos

 

 

 

 

 

 

Famous rock carvings of Buddha and attendants

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

In the teahouse at the bottom of the temple, there is a room with many name slips of

past Ohenros who took a rest here.   I was asked by Nozomi (girl in photo) to write a

note too.  Together with my name-slip, she attached them onto the wall.

 

 

 

 

 

 

The walk to Mandaraji (temple 72) leads through a beautiful bamboo forest.

 

 

 

 

 

 

In the late afternoon, I arrived in Zentsūji. It is the birthplace of Kūkai and one of the

three most important sites related to Kūkai (with Kongōbuji, Koyasan and Tōji

temple, Kyoto). The place is huge.  I was lucky that I could stay overnight in the

Shukubō.  The food was delicious!  I participated in the early morning service and

went after the service with the other pilgrims through the pitch-dark 270 feet long

tunnel underneath the altar.  Unfortunately, people were talking and I could not

experience darkness and silence at the same time.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Five story pagoda in Zentsūji

 

 

 

 

 

 

Camphor tree in Zentsūji

 

 

 

 

 

 

Statue of Kōbō Daishi in the background

.

.

.

Posted in Shikoku (Four States or Provinces) | Leave a comment

Shikoku Pilgrimage 2016 by Garyo, 27

 

 

 

Kotohiki Park and the coin shaped sand drawing (temples 68/69)

 

 

It was a beautiful day when I walked to Jinnein and Kannonji (temples 68,69).

I passed fields with wheat, gardens with colorful flowers and a bell tower in a

cemetery overlooking a lake.

 

 

 

 

IMG_9412

 

 

 

 

 

 

IMG_9409

 

 

By crossing the Saita River, I passed the Torii  (gate) of Kotohiki Jinja  located on the

“Zither Strumming Hill”.  According to a legend, Kotohikiyama got the name from an

event that happened 1 300 years ago. When a high-ranking priest meditated on the

hill, Hachiman Bosatsu came down from the sky and a boat filled with beautiful

zither music arrived close to the shore.  The priest, with the help of villagers, pulled

the boat out of the ocean and enshrined it on the hill together with the zither.  In

former times, Buddhism and Shintōism was mixed.

 

When I arrived at the shrine, beautiful zither music filled the air. For hundreds of

years, people around Japan believed that this shrine is offering protection to

seafarers.

 

 

 

 

IMG_5573

 

 

Torii to the Kotohiki Jinja

 

 

 

 

IMG_5576 (1)

 

 

Stairways up to the shrine

 

 

I was lucky this day that I met an English speaking Japanese who could show me around.

 

 

 

 

IMG_5581

 

 

My nice guide showed me a stone stele donated by his ancestors.

 

 

17th century – style coin made out of sand (Kan-ei-tsūhō). The round looking sand

coin is actually an oval of 122m from West to East and 90m from North to South.

This oval shape is done intentionally, so it will look like a circle from the hill above.

Twice a year volunteers reshape it.

 

 

 

 

IMG_5585

 

 

Gorgeous old pine trees surround the sand coin.

 

 

 

 

IMG_5605

 

 

I love ancient trees.  Most of the time I could find them in the areas of temples and shrines.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hundreds of years old camphor tree in Kannonji (temple 69). Jinnein (temple 68) is

only 150 feet away.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The path to Motoyamaji (temple 70) goes along the Saita River.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Saita River

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A row of carp flags (koinobori) fluttering in the wind anticipates the national holiday

of boys’ day on May 5.  On this day (tango-no-sekku, 5/5), the nation celebrates the

happiness of children.  The celebration goes back to the ancient Japanese Iris festival

at the court.  Originally, mugwort was hung to dispel evil spirits.

.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ohenros are lighting candles before going to the main hall of Motoyamaji. The

temple grounds are surrounded by an unusual blue wall (See in background)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Brooms used to sweep the temple grounds

 

 

 

 

 

 

In Motoyamaji (temple 70), a 5-story pagoda was under construction (part of it you

can see to the left of the photo). The main Hall is designated as a National Treasure.

 

After leaving Motoyamaji, I passed a Lawson grocery store.  Lawson and Seven-

Eleven, both convenient stores, were stores I could rely on. Typical for these stores

are the huge parking lots. They were all along the way and I could buy there

everything I needed.  Most of the time, I bought nuts, Onigiri (rice balls), bananas

and water for lunch.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

.

.

 

Posted in Shikoku (Four States or Provinces) | Leave a comment

Shikoku Pilgrimage 2016 by Garyo, 26

 

 

Kagawa, Place of Nirvana (temples 66-88)

 

Go-hyaku-Rakan (500 Buddhist disciples), Unpenji, temple 66

 

 

It was hard to leave Zuiōji.  I missed the monks and the harmonious way they lived

together. I was sad that a beautiful stage of my life was over. Sometimes I passed

parks with cherry trees where uncountable pink blossoms were covering the ground.

But like the new, green leaves sprouting out of the branches, new experiences were

waiting for me.  I just was confronted with impermanence.

.

 

 

 

 

IMG_9125

 

 

 

 

 

 

IMG_5424

 

 

 

 

 

 

IMG_9130

 

 

A man pruning his Bonsais

 

 

 

 

IMG_5441

 

 

On the way up to Upenji (temple 66), I saw a peculiar resting place for pilgrims.

Unpenji is called the temple in the clouds and is the highest mountain temple of the

whole Shikoku pilgrimage (927 m). It was freezing cold when I arrived. The walk up

to the temple was mostly on a street that was not so steep.

 

 

 

 

IMG_5448

 

 

The woman working in the fields near Unpenji wears the typical outfit of women

living in the countryside. Normally, the body (except face) is totally covered.

 

 

 

 

IMG_9264

 

 

The view from Unpenji was spectacular.  In the distance, Honshū (the main island of

Japan) was visible.

 

 

 

 

IMG_9147

 

 

Entrance gate with bell to Unpenji

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

IMG_9149Unpenji is famous for a huge eggplant sculpture. People can sit on, make a wish and

hope that the wish will come true.  The reason for the connection between eggplant

and wish fulfilling is explained by the word “nasu” which means eggplant as well as

the verb “accomplish, achieve or attain”.

 

For me, however, the most fascinating sculptures were the Rakans (or Arakans, from

Arahant), the 500 statues of Buddha’s first disciples.  Their faces were incredible

humorous and expressive. It is said that one can look for a face most similar to his/

her own and get insight.

 

 

 

 

IMG_9276 (2)

 

 

Start of the collection of 500 Rakans

 

 

 

 

IMG_5529

 

 

 

 

 

 

IMG_5511

 

 

 

 

 

 

IMG_9240

 

 

 

 

 

 

IMG_5503

 

 

The 9 km long path down to the coastal plains leads through forests with blooming

azaleas and agricultural land.

 

 

 

 

IMG_9324

 

 

I especially loved a pond filled with lotus seeds and dried stems. Seeing the lotus

flowers in full bloom must be beautiful.

 

 

 

 

 

 

IMG_9332

 

 

.

.

.

 

Posted in Shikoku (Four States or Provinces) | Leave a comment

Shikoku Pilgrimage 2016 by Garyo, 25

 

 

Eight Days in the Sōtō Zen temple Zuiōji 

 

 

The Sōtō Zen temple Zuiōji is located in Niihama and lies directly in walking distance

to the Henro-no-michi (88 temple hike). Rosan Rōshi, my Zen teacher, suggested

that I stay there for some days. Zuiōji was his own training monastery. His teacher,

Katagiri Rōshi, has sent many students there for learning the Zen way. The temple is

located at the foot of a densely forested mountain.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

IMG_5148

 

 

Bodhidharma surrounded by moss covered Cedar trees 

in front of the entrance stairway

 

 

 

 

IMG_5214

 

 

First entrance gate of Zuiōji, with the green copper roof 

of the Hattō (Dharma Hall) in the background

 

 

 

 

 

IMG_5116

 

 

 

Second entrance gate with the copper roof visible at the top of the stairs

 

 

It was misty and rainy when I arrived at the temple in the early morning.  The cherry

trees were in full bloom. Daikaisan, the tenzo (cook) of Zuiōji, welcomed me warmly.

His ability to speak German and English was an incredible help for me to follow the

strict rules and time schedule of temple life. Although I often made mistakes, I never

felt like an outsider (although I was, being the only foreigner and the only woman

there). In Zuiōji, I saw and experienced the true meaning of harmony and integration.

 

 

 

 

IMG_5141

 

 

        Falling blossoms of the white blooming magnolia tree in front of Hattō (Dharma Hall) 

 

 

In one of the working periods, we collected the fallen and wilted blossoms in big

bags.

 

 

 

 

IMG_8999.

 

In the life of a Zen temple, no oral orders are given.  The monks know what to do by

particular sounds of instruments. Only a few people have a clock – like the monk

in the Hattō beating the hokku (Dharma drum) and bell.

 

 

 

 

IMG_5185

 

 

Hokku and temple bell mounted in the Hattō

 

In the Hattō were also other instruments used for ceremony and rituals.

 

 

 

 

IMG_8990

 

 

Bhodidharma (Daruma in Japanese), painted by Tsūgen Narasaki Rōshi

 

 

The painting is mounted in the Hattō. Bodhidharma (6th century) brought Chan

Buddhism (Zen) to China.

 

Beside meditation, working (samu) is a major practice in the Zen temple.  The day

started at 3:50 a.m. with zazen (meditation) and ended at 9:35 p.m. with the last

meditation period. In between there were periods of working, sutra chanting, tea

ceremony, service, eating and – one important pillar of a Zen temple – bathing.

The daily hot bath was an incredible treat! During the short resting periods, I often

fell asleep.

 

 

 

 

 

IMG_5192

 

 

The outer part of the Sōdō or meditation hall, where I meditated

 

The monks in residence meditate and also sleep in the inner room. In the meditation

hall, breakfast is served in the traditional form (with ōryōki, a set of bowls, chop-

sticks, spoon, wiping cloth, etc., lit. suitable amount vessels for the person/occasion).

As a newcomer, I was supposed to finish eating first – but most of the time I was last.

Eating with chopsticks and following all the rituals of how to eat was a challenge.

 

 

 

 

IMG_5189

 

 

The gyoban (fish-shaped drum, lit. fish plate, hallow inside also called ) was

hanging from the ceiling at the end of the meditation hall where I was sitting.

It is used as a signal to start and end rituals, mainly to indicate the start of a meal.

A fish never sleeps and symbolizes wakefulness and devotion to the practice.

 

Another instrument to indicate meals is the Umpan, or cloud shaped gong.  It is

placed near the kitchen and beside the altar of the kitchen God.

 

 

 

 

IMG_8979

 

 

Umpan in front of the altar of the kitchen God

 

Once a day in the morning, a tea ceremony, together with the greeting of the abbot

Tsūgen Narasaki Rōshi, was celebrated.  When I asked one time why there is no

Dharma talk, Daikai-san answered “ Tsūgen Rōshi is the living Dharma himself”.

I really saw that.

 

 

 

 

 

IMG_8987 (1)

 

This building is called “Kōmyōzō” (lit. Light Storage,  meaning nirvana: shikantaza,
 .
total sitting, storing the ligh: awakening) after the calligraphy in the center (derived
.
from the work “Kōmyōzō Samadhi” by Koun Ejo, the 2nd abbot of Eiheiji).

 

 

 

 

 

IMG_9016 (2)

 

Kannon with Comfort mudra (hand sign)

 

 

 

 

 

 

IMG_5178

 

 

During the working periods, we often did sweeping and weeding in the garden.

I took this photo at the dragon lake, a lake surrounded by blooming cherry trees.

I loved working with the young monks. In Zuiōji, we were busy nearly all the time.

It is a training to keep the zazen mind – the mind of attentiveness and mindfulness –

throughout the day.

 

 

 

 

 

IMG_8920 (1)

 

 

Dragon lake with blooming cherry blossom trees

 

 

 

 

 

IMG_5143

 

The Bell Tower on the gate is called Kyotairo, Teaching-body Tower, wherefrom 108
.
bell ringings are hit by the duty monk toward the end of the morning sitting, telling
 .
the dawning to the sitters and the neighborhood (dispelling the night of nescience,
.
jo-ya-no-kane) coordinated with the drum in the Sōdō, Meditaters Hall, and the um-
.
pan at the kitchen finishing their sound in unison. I enjoyed the sounds decreasing
.
and disappearing into peace (108 defilements melting into nirvana).

 

 

In one of the working periods, the monk Shinsan let me rake the gravel in the big

rock garden.  After walking several times back and forth, doing my best, the lines

had slight curves.  I needed much more practice.  He continued by himself.

 

 

 

 

IMG_5146 (1)

 

 

It happened that I stayed in Zuiōji on Buddha’s birthday, April 8.  His birthday in

Japanese is called Kanbutsue (lit. Washing Buddha Meeting, bathing Buddha with

sweet tea, also called Hana-matsuri, Flower Festival, flowers offered to him, at the

time of cherry blossoms in full bloom). It was great to be part of the preparation for

this festival.  I helped to retrieve the white elephant and decorate it with the blossoms

and flowers we picked from the ground in the gardens of Zuiōji.

 

 

 

 

IMG_8942

 

 

Little side temple where the white Elephant is stored

 

 

The tree branch in the right forefront is part of a 1000-year-old Ginko tree.

 

 

 

 

IMG_8952

 

 

1000 year old Ginko Tree

 

 

 

 

IMG_9036

 

 

Monks decorating the little canopy

 

 

 

IMG_9042

 

 

 

Collected fallen blossoms and flowers

 

 

 

 

IMG_9082 (1)

 

 

The white elephant in front of the Hattō hall.  The meaning of the white elephant

goes back to the story of Queen Mayadevi, Buddha’s mother, who had a dream one

night that a white elephant entered her body. This is how she conceived Buddha.

The statue of little Buddha is placed in a bowl filled with amacha (sweet tea) under

the flower-decorated canopy.

 

 

 

 

IMG_9083

 

 

People were pouring amacha, sweet tea, with bamboo ladles over the Buddha statue

(under the canopy).  This comes from the legend that a Ryu, Dragon, in the heavens

poured perfumed warm water on Buddha when he was a newborn baby.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

IMG_9065

 

 

The day I left, cherry blossoms covered the dragon lake, the mossy grounds, and

driveways. I was sad to leave.

 

 

 

 

IMG_5406

 

 

Daikai-san (tenzo) and I shortly before I left Zuiōji to continue my pilgrimage.

We are sitting in the position of seiza (not an easy way for me to sit). The photo was

taken in the tatami room I slept in during my 8 days there.

 

 

 

 

IMG_5394

 

 

90 year old abbot Tsūgen Narasaki Rōshi saying goodbye on my last day there

 

I was so grateful that I could stay at Zuiōji.

.

.

.

.

Posted in Shikoku (Four States or Provinces) | Leave a comment

Shikoku Pilgrimage 2016 by Garyo, 24

 

 

Mount Ishizuchi and two Jinjas  (temples 63, 64)

 

 

At nearly 2000 m, Mount Ishizuchi is not only the highest mountain of Shikoku but

also one of the seven holiest mountains in Japan. The sharp, rocky summit resembles

a hammer, therefore the name Ishizuchi. The mountain is accessible by a cable-car.

At the foot of Ishizuchi stands the Ishizuchi Jinja, a Shintō shrine.

 

 

 

 

 

IMG_8782

 

Entrance to the Ishizuchi Jinja with two Koma-inus 

(guardian lions, lit. Korean–dogs) in front of the entrance gate

 

The concept goes back to Chinese guardian lions to ward off evil introduced through

Korea.

 

 

 

 

IMG_8786

 

A Tengu, one of the guardians inside the gate behind glass  

His long nose relates to his hatred of arrogance and prejudice.  He holds a feather fan

in his right hand with which he can produce great winds. The origin of the Tengu

also goes back to Chinese folklore.

 

Although in Shintōism everything has Kami or spirit, the horse has the important

function of being a bridge between the ordinary world and the world of the Kami.

When I visited the shrine, the priests prepared the whole area for the celebration of

Hanami (cherry blossom festival). Colorful lanterns were hanging between trees as

part of the preparation.

 

 

 

 

 

IMG_8792

 

 

The sacred horse with lanterns and a blooming cherry tree

 

 

 

 

IMG_8799 (3)

 

 

This place is a place of “washing away impurities”.

 

 

 

 

IMG_8819 (1)

 

 

Sweeping the pathway is an important practice in temples and shrines.

The sweeping priest suggested hugging a very old Cedar Tree. Sacred trees are

considered pillars to the spiritual world.

 

 

 

 

IMG_8822 (1)

 

 

Hugging the huge Cedar tree with a Shimenawa  (rope) wrapped around it

 

Saijo City is not only well known for its fantastic water taste (many wells are in the

area), but also for the Shrine Festivals. Over 100 portable shrines are carried by float-

bearers in October.  The bearers wear traditional outfits.  The most important shrine

at this festival is the Isono Shrine.

 

 

 

 

 

IMG_8870

 

 

This nice boy was my guide leading me to the Isono Jinja.  We only communicated

with sign and body language.

 

 

 

 

 

 

IMG_8885

 

 

 

 

IMG_8880

 

 

Statue of Konohasanakuya-Hime, the cherry tree blooming princess

 

 

She is the symbol of delicate earthly life and considered an avatar of  life in Japanese.

 

 

 

 

IMG_5101

 

 

Powerful roots of a Camphor tree surrounded by a Shimenawa

 

At the shore of the Kamo River, people were celebrating Hanami, Cherry-blossom

Veiwing (lit. Flower Veiwing).

 

 

 

 

IMG_5108 (1)

 

 

 

 

 

 

IMG_8896

 

 

Hanami celebration

.

.

.

Posted in Shikoku (Four States or Provinces) | Leave a comment

Shikoku Pilgrimage 2016 by Garyo, 23

 

Shaking hands with Kōbō Daishi (temples 59, 60, 61, 62)

 

 

Japanese religion is deeply rooted in nature and the sense of touch is very important

for Japanese people.

 

 

 

 

 

IMG_8495

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

IMG_8498

 

 

People are shaking hands with the statue of Kōbō Daishi (called Akushu-shugyō

Daishi, Shake-hand Practice Daishi) and touch the special black stone vase,

Yakushi-no-tsubo“, Yakushi’s  vase, (shown in large letters, above them are eye,

head,foot, etc. are written in circles for people to touch and cure the specific body

parts). Kokubunji’s main deity is Yakushi Nyoraithe Buddha of Healing,

who usuallyholds a vase of medicine.

 

 

 

 

 

IMG_8510

 

Temple area of Kokubunji

 

 

 

IMG_8489

 

Statue of Yakushi Nyorai, the healing Buddha

 

 

 

IMG_8573

 

Many school children in Japan wear uniforms (in Tokyo only children going to

private school wear uniforms); Yellow caps are usually distributed to elementary

school children, so drivers can see them better.

 

 

 

 

 

IMG_8578

 

Kōbō Daishi at the roadside to Yokomineji, temple 60

 

 

Yokomineji is an isolated mountain temple and not easy to reach.  I loved the way up

to the temple grounds. Many Jizōs where placed beside the path. The moss covered

rocks and cedar trees created a feeling of rootedness and belonging.

 

 

 

 

 

IMG_8608

 

 

 

 

 

 

IMG_8605

 

 

 

 

 

 

IMG_8623

 

Yokomineji (temple 60) famous for the Rhododendron bushes to the left. I would

have loved to see them in full bloom.

 

 

 

 

 

IMG_8624

 

Sutra chanting bus Ohenros

 

 

On the walk down to Saijō city, I passed the Shirataki waterfall (part of the Okunoin

temple, which is a detached temple of Kouonji).  The main deity is Fudō-myō-ō

(Acala), the unmovable one and bringer of light. Kongara Douji and Seitaka Douji,

two child servants, are standing right and left of him.

 

 

 

 

 

IMG_8659

 

 

 

 

 

 

IMG_8693

 

Kōonji (temple 61) is a huge, modern temple made out of concrete.  I did not fall in

love with this building.  Cherry trees in full bloom were softening the serious

appearance and brought some playfulness into the site.Overnight I stayed in the

Komatsu Ryokan, famous for serving Sukiyaki cooked in an iron pot on the table.

All the guests were pilgrims, many of them I knew.  It was a nice reunion!

 

 

 

 

 

IMG_8703

 

 

 

 

 

 

IMG_8705

 

Ingredients for Sukiyaki

.

.

.

Posted in Shikoku (Four States or Provinces) | Leave a comment

Shikoku Pilgrimage 2016 by Garyo, 22

 

Nankōbō  and the lost Kongōzue  (temples 54- 58)

 

The day I visited Nankōbō I was, like most of the Ohenros, a pilgrim coming in a car.

It was the car of my Japanese friends who had a meeting in Matsuyama city at the

same time I was there. It was such a coincidence! We were able to spend a day

together.

 

After visiting Enmeiji (54), we drove to Nankōbō, a city temple were buses and cars

had to park on the temple grounds because of a lack of alternative parking spaces.

It was busy and restless there. Like always, I had put my Kongō-zue, Diamond-

staff into the stone container in front of the Daishidō in order to do the ritual. Many

other Kongōzue from bus pilgrims where placed there too.  When I wanted to get my

staff again, it was gone.  Another Ohenro took my Kongōzue by mistake!  I was very

sad.  It made me aware how attached I had become to my staff.

 

 

 

 

 

IMG_8394

 

The Hondō of Nankōbō, temple 55

 

 

 

 

 

IMG_8398

 

The new Kongōzue and I in front of the Daishidō

 

 

 

 

 

 

IMG_8407

 

One of four guardians (Shitennō) called Zōjōten, 

the guardian of the south gate of Nankōbō

 

Usually, the temple gates are guarded by Niō – two strong guardians called A-gyō,

A-form, with an open mouth and Un-gyō with a closed mouth.  The name of the

temple Nankōbō is unusual, as most of the temples end in “ji”, which means temple.

The reason is that it started as one of twentyfour detached bōs (staying place/temple:

shukubō, the formal name: Bekkusan Kōmyōji Kongōin Nankobō) of Ōyamagami 

Jinja of Ōmishima. Most temples were built in the traditional way.  However

sometimes, modern buildings coexisted with the old style, like in Eifukuji.

 

 

 

 

 

IMG_8440 (1)

 

Eifukuji, temple 57 with the modern building

 

Originally, we planned to only visit temple 54 and 55 with the car. I wanted to stay

overnight in Imabari City and continue to walk from there.  However, due to an

event, every hotel and Ryokan was booked.  Yuko and Shigeo helped me to find a

Ryokan called Mikado in Nibukawa Onsen, 10 km off the pilgrim’s trail. It was a

family run traditional Onsen Ryokan with great bath, good food and very nice people.

 

 

 

 

 

IMG_8466

 

Basket with a cotton Yukata and belt, towels and a bag 

with toothbrush, toothpaste, brush and other little things

 

 

 

 

 

 

IMG_8482

 

Flower arrangement in the dining room of Mikado 

 

Japanese dining is very sophisticated.

 

Every Japanese meal includes dishes of five tastes, five colors and fives ways. The five

tastes are sweet, sour, salty, spicy and bitter, sometimes spicy is replaced by umami,

translated as pleasant savory taste. The five colors are red, white, black, yellow and

green and the five ways include boil/simmer, roast/broil/grill, raw, fry and steam.

The arrangement is always beautiful and artistic. Eating Japanese food is a feast for

the senses!

 

Before the meal is served, every restaurant provides the oshibori, a warm, wet towel

to clean the hands.  During the summer months, it is usually cold.  One bows in

gassho (folded hands) and says “Itadakimasu” (I gratefully receive, lit. I put it on my

head) before starting to eat.  It is polite to eat everything served. At the end of the

meal, one bows again and says “Gochisōsama deshita” (thank you for the feast, lit.

thank you for your having running around – for getting, cooking, serving, etc.).

 

It was a real feast in Mikado to eat dinner there.

 

 

 

IMG_8473

 

 

One of the owners served the food. The dish on the right side is rice with a rice

spatula on the top. In the middle, the dish cooked at the table is called nabemono

(lit. things of pan or earthen-ware). The grilled fish on the left was served on a stick

and looked like it was still floating in the water. Sashimi or raw fish is in between

the fish and nabemono.

 

 

 

 

IMG_8478

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

IMG_8481

 

 

 

 

 

 

IMG_5002

 

A very warm good by at the Mikado

Posted in Shikoku (Four States or Provinces) | Leave a comment