Alps Autumn Atmosphere

 

 

Garyo, whose pilgrimage travelogue with beautiful pictures posted here recently, had her hike in the lower Alps and shared her pictures with me. So, I wanted to share them with our readers. She kindly prepared her notes on those pictures as below: 

 

 

Two days ago, I went for a day hike in the lower Alps, an area called Ramsau. It is

approximately one hour south of Vienna. The weather was unusual warm and

stormy.  Sometimes, several feet high dried leaves , collected by the wind, covered

the path.

 

 

 

 

Picture1

 

 

 

I went with my hiking friend Waltraud, who seems to know every mountain in this

area.  Only a few flowers had survived previous cold days.  Most of them have turned

into seeds.

 

 

 

 

Picture10

 

 

 

 

Picture11

 

 Some areas were covered with golden brown grass

 

 

 

 

Picture12

 

 

 

 

 

Picture13

 

 

We followed the red, white red marking of the trail.

 

 

 

 

Picture14

 

 

 

When we arrived at the Enzianhütte, the cabin in the top of the mountain Kieneck

(3400 feet), the weather had turned.  Dark clouds were coming from the south.

We were the only guests in the cabin.  All the other hikers had left already.

 

 

 

 

IMG_9982

 

 

 

It was a great sky with unusual cloud formations. The light turned the distant

mountains into fading blue shapes.

 

 

 

 

IMG_9988

 

 

 

 

By 5 p.m., it turned dark already.  Unfortunately, the clouds covered the almost full

moon. The last section of the trail, we had to hike in the dark.

 

 

 

 

IMG_0025

 

 

Sunset

 

Posted in Alps | Leave a comment

Pilgrimage to Santiago de Compostela: Day 41

 

 

 

DAY FOURTYONE

OSTABAT-ASME  -  SAINT-JEAN-PIED-DE-PORT

 

 

But if it sings it’s a good sign

A sign you can sign your name

Then very gently you’ll detach

A feather from the bird

And write your name in a corner of the painting.

                                                                    Jaques Prévert

 

 

 

In order to meet Emeline, I got up at 4:30 am.  Emeline wanted to continue her way

to Santiago today and I agreed to meet her around noon. It was totally dark when I

left the refuge, with the half moon shining through the fog. My headlamp helped me

to see the markers on the way.

 

 

 

 

IMG_9762

 

Early sunrise

 

 

 

It was a gorgeous hike.  Sheep peacefully grazed in the meadows and the sound of

ringing cowbells filled the air. The organization “Amis du Chemin de Compostelle”

planted fruit trees with old varieties along the way and even as they were not ripe yet,

I appreciated their effort.

 

 

 

 

IMG_9769

 

 

 

 

 

IMG_9768

 

Pommier Reine de Reinettes

 

 

 

The path lead through atmospheric villages and all would have been perfect, would

I have not forgotten my bread for breakfast. For four hours, I had nothing to eat.

Also, I did not drink the usual coffee in the morning. The day became extremely hot

with 104 degree Fahrenheit and hardly any shade.  When I arrived in the village of

Saint-Jean-le-Vieux, I was totally exhausted.

 

 

 

 

IMG_9784

 

Village Saint-Jean-le Vieux (Donazaharre)

 

 

 

The breakfast in a bar was extremely rewarding and I rested for a long time.  Before

I left town, I visited the nearby church.  There, on a gravestone in the cemetery, laid

the most beautiful bird I have ever seen. The bird was dead.  It was a barn owl, hardly

grown out of its childhood with still a veil of white feathers around the bigger, golden

brown ones.  The sight of beauty and dread, undivided, totally shook me up.  Who

killed this beautiful being? Who put it on this gravestone? Everything was a total

mystery to me.  It affected me so much that, two days later, I had a dream of a dead

bird becoming alive again and flying off into the big sky.

 

 

 

 

 

 

IMG_9790

 

 

 

 

Through the medieval gate of St. James, I entered St. Jean-Pied-de-Port at noon.

Emeline was already expecting me in front of one of the street cafes.  It was so great

to see her.  For hours, we spoke about our experiences along the way.  She was sad

to leave the solitude and missed already the French greeting of the pilgrims, “Bon

Courage.” Now, the greeting would become  “Buen Camino” with hundreds of

pilgrims walking the way to Santiago each day.

 

 

 

 

IMG_9803

 

Emeline and I

 

 

 

Saint-Jean-Pied-de-Port is a bursting town full of pilgrims of all ages and

nationalities. Many of them start their way to Santiago de Compostela from there

and had their first day of hiking over the Pyreneans to Roncesvalles in front of them

– a very strenuous hike.

 

 

 

 

IMG_9813

 

Rue de la Citadelle

 

 

 

 

IMG_9816

 

Another view of Rue de la Citadelle

 

 

 

I stayed in the refuge “L’Esprit du Chemin”, the refuge Huberta and Arnold once

owned, the couple I had met in the beginning of my pilgrimage in Le Chemin.

 

The new Basque owner took great care of the pilgrims.  We each introduced each

other at the dinner table. There were fourteen pilgrims on this day at his refuge, less

than usual.  Two pilgrims from Belgium started their pilgrimage in their hometown

in Belgium and had already hiked for more than three months.  Four pilgrims came

from Spain, two from America, one from Switzerland, two from Ireland. There was

also one Canadian and one French guy. We all shared our stories.  For most of them,

it was the start or the continuation of the pilgrimage

 

 

 

 

IMG_9839

 

Hospitaliér Jaxelus saying words of introduction

 

 

 

 

IMG_9833

 

Shoes left in the refuge used as flowerpots

 

 

 

 

IMG_9810

 

View from the terrace of the refuge to the Citadelle

 

 

 

At the end of the day, I went to the church of Notre Dame and was lighting a candle

as a thank you to the Way I was able to walk.  Even with some difficulties along the

way, the feeling of joy and deep thankfulness for life was always with me.   With that,

I want to express my gratitude for those who walked with me and I hope that you

could feel the Spirit of the Way, which is a Spirit of Joy. Thank you!

 

 

 

 

 

IMG_9825

 

 

 

 

- Text and photos contributed by Garyo -

- This is the last of this pilgrimage series -

- Thank you Garyo and all walking with! -

 

 

 

 

 

Posted in Pilgrimage | Leave a comment

Pilgrimage to Santiago de Compostela: Day 40

 

 

 

DAY FOURTY

OSSERAIN-RIVAREYTE  -  OSTABAT-ASME

 

 

Paint the green leaves too and the wind’s coolness

The dust in the sunlight

The sound of insects, in the grass, in the summer heat

Then wait for the bird to choose to sing

If the bird won’t sing

That’s an adverse sign

A sign that the painting is bad…….

                                                          Jaques Prévert

 

 

Dense fog covered the village when I left that morning.  Shortly after leaving

Osserain, I came to an ancient stone marking the border between Béarn and the once

independent kingdom of Navarre.  With that, I entered the Land of the Basque.

The Basque language is very unusual because it does not have any similarities with

an Aryan language.  Of the seven Basque regions, three are located in France.

 

 

 

 

IMG_9658

 

Border stone between Béarn and Navarre

 

 

 

The fog had cast a great stillness over the country. Every spider web was covered

with tiny pearls of water.

 

 

 

 

 

IMG_9660

 

 

 

 

 

IMG_9663

 

 

 

 

 

IMG_9668

 

 

 

The Basque houses have a very distinctive appearance. The color maroon can be seen

on many wooden elements outside of the house.  Men like to wear the Basque hat.

 

 

 

 

IMG_9680

 

 

 

 

IMG_9683

 

Basque man mowing the grass with a scythe

 

 

 

A few days before I arrived at the town of Saint-Palais, in Basque called Donapaleu,

severe thunderstorms caused a lot of destruction.  Some parts of a road were

completely washed away.  It had not rained so much for 150 years.

 

 

 

 

IMG_9690

 

 

 

 

 

IMG_9691

 

Town  Saint - Palais (Donapaleu)

 

 

 

Shortly after the town Saint-Palais, a stele is marking the meeting of three

pilgrimage ways to Santiago de Compostela.  The stele is called Stele of Gibraltar

and refers to the Basque name “Chibaltarem”, which means “to meet.”   The Via

Lemovicensis meets with the way from Puy-en-Velay (Via Podiensis) and the way

from Tour (Via Tourensis). The stele is made in the form of a Basque tombstone.

 

 

 

 

IMG_9699

 

Stele of Gibraltar

 

 

From there, a steep road is leading up to a chapel on the top of the hill -  Chapelle de

Soyarce.  Some pilgrims rested under the shade of the trees.  Also Luni and Mathilda

were there.  They hitchhiked some of the way. It was very nice to see them again.

Up high in the sky, uncountable large vultures were circling the area.   The view to

the Pyreneans was breathtaking.

 

 

 

IMG_9700

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

IMG_9702

 

Chapelle de Soyarce surrounded by trees

 

 

 

 

 

IMG_9740

 

 

 

 

 

IMG_9720

 

 

 

 

 

From farther away, the villages look like villages in the Austrian Alps. Since Saint-

Sever, I did not have to make reservations anymore. Like on the Camino in Spain,

it was on a first come first served basis. There were a lot of pilgrims in Ostabat-

Asme, a town with 230 inhabitants. In former times, it was a big pilgrim’s center

with sometimes 5,000 pilgrims staying overnight.  In the restaurant beside the

church, I met Berit, a woman from Germany. We decided to walk together to a farm

one mile outside of the village and stay overnight there.

 

 

 

 

IMG_9742

 

Village of Ostabat-Asme

 

 

The farm Gaineko Extea has 50 beds, but this day, only a Belgium and a Dutch

couple and Berit and I were staying there.  The farm provided very comfortable

rooms, each with a balcony.  Besides a delicious meal, we also got a music

performance.  Bernard (I have forgotten his Basque name) was singing Basque

songs for us.

 

 

 

 

IMG_9756

 

Bernard, the Basque hospitaliér, singing Basque songs

 

 

In the evening, I got a text message from Emeline.  She had heard that I arrived in

Ostabat and suggested we meet in Saint-Jean-Pied-de-Port.  I was overjoyed to be

able to see her again.

 

 

 

Text and photos contributed by Garyo -

 

 

 

 

Posted in Pilgrimage | Leave a comment

Pilgrimage to Santiago de Compostela Day 39

 

 

 

 

 

DAY THIRTYNINE

ORTHEZ  - OSSERAIN-RIVAREYTE

 

 

Then

Erase all the bars one by one

Taking care not to touch a feather of the bird

Then paint a picture of the tree

Choosing the loveliest branches

For the bird……..

Jaques Prévert

 

 

After a nice breakfast with the other four pilgrims, I left the town and was intrigued

by the beauty of the countryside.  In the distance, the Pyreneans were already visible.

The area was hilly with little villages and many vibrant blooming flowers.

 

 

 

 

IMG_9548

 

Mairie (city hall) of Lanneplaà

 

 

 

 

IMG_9566

 

 

 

 

 

IMG_9562

 

 

 

 

 

IMG_9565

 

Morning glory

 

 

In the village l’Hôtipal d’Orion, a statue of a pilgrim is walking toward the 13th

century church Sainte-Marie-de Madeleine. Once, this was an important place

for the medieval pilgrims.  Remains of a pilgrim’s hospital founded in 1114 can

still be seen.  When I walked into the church, cool air was welcoming me.  Little

mushrooms growing in between the cracks of the stone floor obviously loved it too.

 

 

 

 

IMG_9574

 

Statue of a pilgrim with staff, shell and the typical pilgrim’s hat

 

 

 

 

IMG_9577

 

Church Sainte-Marie-Madeleine with cemetery

 

 

 

 

IMG_9582

 

 

 

In the shade of the forest beside a creek, I rested for a long time.  Hundreds of

fluorescent blue dragonflies were restlessly flying above the water.  One even

landed on my arm.  This was a very special place to be.

 

 

 

 

 

 

IMG_9590 (1)

 

 

 

 

 

IMG_9599

 

 

 

 

 

IMG_9587

 

 

 

At 5 p.m. I arrived in the medieval town Sauveterre–de-Béarn, a medieval town

situated on a hill. The name Sauveterre means refuge.

 

 

 

 

IMG_9610

 

Approaching the town of Sauveterre-de Béarn

 

 

 

In the clear and clean water of the river Gave d’Oloron, people were swimming.

It was so refreshing to see clean water and I wished that I had had more time to

stay there too.

 

 

 

 

IMG_9612

 

Public bathing beach along the river Rave d’Orlonge with a little restaurant closeby

 

 

 

 

IMG_9616

 

Stairs up to the city 

 

 

 

 

IMG_9627

 

Église Saint-André

 

 

 

A city wall with many medieval buildings inside surrounds the town.  The most

fascinating structure is a stone bridge ending in the middle of the river.  The 12th

century bridge was once continued by a wooden structure.  This bridge is connected

with a legend.  It is said that in 1170, Queen Sancie of Béarn was submitted to the

judgment of God.  She was thrown into the river with hands and feet tied because

she was accused of having murdered her newly born deformed son.  She survived

and was declared innocent.  Therefore, the bridge is called Ponte de Legende.

 

 

 

 

IMG_9621

 

Pont de la Legende

 

 

 

 

 

IMG_9624

 

 

The city is a tourist destination and did not provide accommodation for pilgrims.

The tourist office recommended staying in the village 2 miles west from the city, in

the village Osserain-Rivareyte. I happily agreed, because the owner of the refuge,

Pascal, promised to pick me up from the tourist office after an hour. I could do

sightseeing without a back bag.

 

 

 

 

IMG_9611

 

 

 

The refuge I stayed in was a house directly beside the cemetery and behind a place

where the popular Basque ball game Pelota was played.  Two teams of girls played

against each other, each hitting the little ball with great force against the wall.

Originally, the people played it with bare hands. Now they use wooden rackets.

The village people enjoyed watching it.

 

 

 

 

IMG_9641

 

The high wall called Fronton where the Basque ball game Pelota is played

 

 

 

Pascal is a retired stonemason. He and his father and grandfather made nearly all of

the tombstones at the cemetery.  For the past  eight years, he told me, he invites

pilgrims to stay in his house, where he lives alone.  He is a great cook and we had a

full menu – vegetable soup, chicken with sauce and noodles, chocolate cake with

fruit salad, cheese and red wine from Rioja. As an aperitif, he served white

Muskateller.  It was such a treat!

 

 

 

 

IMG_9647

 

Pascal’s house beside the cemetery

 

 

 

 

IMG_9632

 

Dinner with Pascal

 

 

 

- Text and photos contributed by Garyo -

 

 

 

 

Posted in Pilgrimage | Leave a comment

Pilgrimage to Santiago de Compostela: Day 38

 

 

 

DAY THIRTYEIGHT

BEYRIES  -  ORTHEZ

 

 

When the bird arrives

If it arrives

Observe the most profound silence

Wait till the bird enters the cage

And when it has

Gently close the door with your brush……

                                                                                                                                                                      Jaques Prévert

 

 

 

After the strange night in the huge dancing hall with me as the only person sleeping

in it, I left Les Landes and entered the region of Pyrénées –Atlantiques with Béarn as

the biggest district in it. In this area, the people speak their own language (language

d’oc).  For a long time, it was forbidden to use this language; now it comes slowly

back.

 

 

 

 

IMG_9481

 

 

The countryside became hilly and the vegetation was more Mediterranean. In the

villages, the houses were well kept and it seemed that the community life was still

intact. People were going for walks and I even met a German couple that moved to

France for their retirement.  They loved the quietness of this place.

 

 

 

 

IMG_9456

 

 

 

 

 

 

IMG_9493

 

Passion Flower

 

 

 

 

IMG_9489

 

Pomegranate

 

 

 

 

IMG_9496

 

One of many birdcages

 

 

 

In the afternoon, I arrived in Orthez, a charming little town located beside the River

Gave-de Pau.  Medieval houses are located on each side of the river with a 14th

century bridge connecting the two sides.  I loved to walk through the city and

discover hidden treasures of medieval architecture.  I also climbed up the 13th

century pentagonal tower of the former castle of the counts of Béarn.  The view over

the city and the countryside was fantastic.

 

 

 

 

IMG_9529

 

Le Pont Vieux, 13th century

 

 

 

 

IMG_9516

 

Main Street down to the refuge

 

 

 

 

IMG_9519

 

Courtyard with medieval architecture

 

 

 

 

IMG_9512

 

13th century tower

 

 

 

The best place, however, was the refuge.  It was located in a Gothic stone building.

One had to walk up stairs to a Gothic tower.  From there, spiral stone stairs lead up to

the rooms of the refuge.  The herb garden in the court is there for the pilgrims to use.

 

 

 

 

IMG_9503 (1)

 

Hôtel de la Lune

 

 

 

IMG_9538

 

 

 

Four other people were staying there too – a French couple and the students Luni

and Mathilda. Mathilda’s feet were badly blistered.  I had everything she needed to

care for them. The French couple was at their end of the pilgrimage, coming from

Le Puy.

 

 

 

 

IMG_9499

 

French couple with Luni and Mathilda

 

 

 

 

- Text and photos contributed by Garyo -

 

 

 

Posted in Pilgrimage | Leave a comment

Pilgrimage to Santiago de Compostela: Day 37

 

 

 

DAY THIRTYSEVEN

SAINT-SEVER  -  BEYRIES

 

 

Sometimes a bird arrives quickly

But equally it may take many years

Before it chooses to                         

Don’t be discouraged

Wait

Wait many years if needed

The speed or tardiness of its arrival

Has nothing to do

With the success of the picture…..

                                                  Jaques Prévert

 

Country streets with nobody driving or walking on it - huge fields of corn and

sunflowers on a completely flat area - houses with the wooden window shutters

closed – nobody seemed to live in this place. Today, I had to walk 30 km.

The visit of the newly renovated Gothic church Notre Dame in Audignon was a nice

change.  After four years of renovation, it opened for the first day when I was there.

 

 

 

 

IMG_9356

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

IMG_9362

 

 

 

 

 

IMG_9365

Sunflowers

 

 

 

 

IMG_9372

Église Notre Dame

 

 

 

 

 

IMG_9379

 

Gothic frescoes behind the altar

 

 

 

 

IMG_9368

 

Former mill

 

 

 

In the town of Hagetmau, I saw for the first time on this trek palm trees growing

beside a church.  I was so tired this day that I did not visit the 12th century crypt

Saint-Girons, but had a nice lunch break in the town beside a refreshing water

fountain.

 

 

 

 

IMG_9413

 

 

 

Like so often, I passed crosses and religious monuments on my way. A statue of St.

Michel on a huge column was standing outside of the town Hagetmeau.  St. Michel is

one of the most popular saints in France. Together with the female warrior Saint

Jean d’Arc, one can find Saint Michel in every church. During the religious wars and

the counterreformation, the Catholics used his story to depict the Protestants as evil.

St. Michel killing Protestantism, symbolized by a human being.

 

 

 

 

IMG_9419

 

 

 

When I arrived in the little village of Beyries, a village with only 87 inhabitants, I

stayed overnight in the most unusual place.  Beside the city hall, (every tiny village

in France seems to have a Mairie), a huge event hall was built.  On one end stood 7

cots ready to use by pilgrims and on the other end there was a bar with a tiny kitchen.

Every time I wanted to go either to the kitchen or bathroom, I had to cross an empty

space of about 90 feet. The shower was placed in the men’s bathroom in between two

urinals. But the shower was great.  For my tired feet, I prepared a wonderful bath

with saltwater in it. I was also thankful that I had a bed to sleep in.

 

 

 

 

IMG_9433

 

Event hall in Beyries

 

 

 

 

IMG_9434

 

So much space…..

- Text and photos contributed by Garyo -

Posted in Pilgrimage | Leave a comment

Pilgrimage to Santiago de Compostela: Day 36

 

 

 

DAY THIRTYSIX

MONT-DE-MASRAN  -  SAINT-SEVER

Then set the canvas against a tree

In a garden

In a grove

Or in a forest

Hide behind the tree

Without speaking

Or moving…

                           Jaques Prévert

 

 

 

When I left the town in the morning, the streets were filled with little booths. There

was a market going on in town.  People prepared their stands for selling fruit,

vegetables, clothing, household goods, electronics……

 

 

 

 

IMG_9272

 

Apricot booth

 

 

The influence of Spain could be seen on posters and cars.  People enjoy bullfights in

this area.  The rules had been changed for the fight, as the bull has to leave the arena

still alive.  Mont-de-Marsan is the capital of Les Landes with about 30,000

inhabitants. Despite the market activities, the town made a somehow sleepy

impression.

 

 

 

 

IMG_9276 (1)

 

French car with the symbol of the European Union and the bull

 

 

 

 

IMG_9292

 

 

 

After Mont-de-Marson, I left the big forest area and saw again the great, big sky.

Meadows full of yellow flowers were scattered along my way.

 

 

 

 

 

IMG_9296

 

 

 

In a little village, people had organized a community walk.  A mother with her two

daughters prepared some refreshments for the passing-by hikers.  They invited me

to have a snack too.

 

 

 

 

 

IMG_9291

 

 

 

 

IMG_9289

 

Community hike

 

 

 

Shortly before I arrived in Saint-Sever, I crossed the river Adour. It was nice to see

water again.

 

 

 

 

IMG_9298

 

 

 

The walk up to the plateau where Saint-Severe is located was a little ravine covered

with deep green moss.  It was beautiful to walk through.  The town itself goes back to

Gallo-Roman times and is full of history.

 

 

 

IMG_9302

 

 

 

The refuge was in a former Jacobine monastery (a religious order founded in Paris in

the beginning of the 13th century).  Here I met the hospitaliér Philippe.  He gave me

a tour of the town and explained the historical significance of the buildings.

Unfortunately, his English sounded more like French and I could not understand

him very well. In the museum of the Couvent des Jakobines, I saw a copy of a world

map from the 11th century Beatus manuscript. It was fascinating to see how medieval

people saw the world at their time.

 

 

 

 

IMG_9322

 

Refuge in the former monastery

 

 

 

 

IMG_9323

 

Former Benedictine monastery Saint-Sever founded in the 10th century

 

 

 

 

 

IMG_9335

Former church of the Jakobine Monastery, now used for events

 

 

 

 

IMG_9316

 

11th century map of the world

- Text and photos contributed by Garyo -

Posted in Pilgrimage | Leave a comment

Pilgrimage to Santiago de Compostela: Day 35

 

 

 

DAY THIRTYFIVE

ROQUEFORT – MONT-DE-MARSAN

 

 

First you paint a cage

With it’s door open

Then paint

Something nice

Something simple

Something lovely

Something useful

For the bird……..

                          Jaques Prévert

 

 

Les Landes with 2.5 million acres of forest was a long stretch for me too to walk

through.  I started to memorize the last poem I had taken with me, the poem of

Jaques Prévert’s To Paint a Picture of a Bird (Pour faire le portrait d’un oiseau).

 

 

 

 

IMG_9187

 

The white sand I was walking on was ideal for making patterns.

 

 

 

After hours of walking on former railroad tracks, I reached the village of Bostens,

where I entered the church.  A recording of Verdi’s Ave Maria was starting to play.

The music went right into my heart.  The many hours of solitude had made me very

receptive.

 

 

 

 

IMG_9206

 

Apsis of the Romanesque church in Bostens

 

 

 

In the village of Gaillères, I had lunch in the Restaurant “Au Coeur des Landes.”

I enjoyed the French cuisine and had for the first time a dessert called “Gateau

Basque”, a cake typical for the Basque country.  It showed me that I was coming

closer to the Spanish border.

 

 

 

 

IMG_9226

 

Gothic church in Gaillères

 

 

 

 

IMG_9230

 

Poppy and I

 

 

 

 

IMG_9244

 

View from the attic of the church

 

 

 

In the town of Bougues, I met the German biker Michael. He planned to stay

overnight in the same refuge in the town Mont-de-Marsan, six miles away from

Bougues. He promised to tell the hospitaliér that I was for sure coming.

 

 

 

 

IMG_9254

 

Marker of the Way in Bourgues

 

 

 

 

IMG_9261

 

Michael on his bike ridingon former railroad tracks

 

 

 

During the last hours to the town of Mont-de-Marsan, I started to recite the Heart

Sutra and forgot the burning feet and all the other aches from walking miles and

miles on the hard asphalt.

 

 

 

 

 

IMG_9267

 

View to the city of Mont-de-Marsan with Gothic house

 

 

 

Thanks to Michael, the hospitaliér did wait for me and showed me the room where I

could stay.  It was a very nice place.  I bought the dinner in a boulangerie close by.

When I entered the bakery, the space was filled with the soft sound of hundreds of

humming bees. They discovered the sweetness of the cakes and where crawling all

over cookies and cakes.  Nobody seemed to care.

 

 

 

 

IMG_9269

 

 

Bees and cakes

- Text and photos contributed by Garyo -

Posted in Pilgrimage | Leave a comment

Pilgrimage to Santiago de Compostela: Days 33 – 34

 

 

 

DAY THIRTYTHREE and THIRTYFOUR

BAZAS  -  CAPTIEUX  - ROQUEFORT

 

 

Lass dir alles geschehen: Schönheit und Schrecken.

Man muss nur gehen: Kein Gefühl ist das fernste….

 

                                                                Rainer Maria Rilke

 

Let it all happen to you: beauty and dread. Just walk – no feeling is too far.

 

 

The two days of hiking were miles and miles and miles straight to the west on a

former railroad track through a dense forest with hardly any villages in between.

The singing of the birds, the sounds of the cicadas and the whispering of the wind

in the treetops were the only sounds going with me.  Several feet high ferns were

growing in between oak and pine trees where the sunlight was making interesting

patterns of light and shade.

 

 

 

 

IMG_9088 (1)

 

 

 

The seemingly endless way to the west reminded me of a saying of Rosenblum Roshi.

He compared our life as being on a railroad track with no beginning or end.  In

reality, he said, there is nobody in front or in the back of you.  Everything is relative.

 

 

 

IMG_9094

 

 

 

The pathway was leading over and under bridges and sometimes the golden yellow

heads of little chanterelles where peaking out of a dense layer of dry oak leaves on

the ground.

 

 

 

IMG_9082

 

 

 

 

 

 

IMG_9084

 

 

In the many hours of walk with not much change of scenery, my mind wanted to be

more active.  Therefore, I started to memorize one of my favorite Rilke poems. Just

walking, breathing, listening to the sounds of nature, feeling the warm air in my face

and the words of the poem filled me with great joy.

 

 

 

 

IMG_9113

 

Chanterelle covered by oak leaves

 

 

In Captieux, I stayed at the Syndicat d’initiative run by the city.  It was a little house

that was newly renovated inside.  After cleaning it a bit, I felt very comfortable.  I

used some of the nettles growing outside for making nettle tea.

 

 

 

 

IMG_9100

 

Terrace of the refuge

 

 

The next day was another day of walking on the former railroad tracks for 23 miles.

Since Captieux, I was in the region of Les Landes. Until the 19th century, this area

was very dangerous to walk through, as the soil consists of white, loose sand, which

became a dangerous swampland during heavy rain.  Napoleon III ordered pine trees

to be planted.  Now Les Landes is one of the biggest forest areas in Europe.

 

 

 

 

IMG_9106

 

 

Sometimes, young kids were riding motorcycles on the straight roads with high

speeds.

 

 

 

 

IMG_9127 (1)

 

 

 

Pigeon hunting and looking for mushrooms are two favorite things people like to do

in Les Landes.  Luckily, I only met mushroom hunters. The mushrooms were not

only plentiful, but also gigantic.

 

 

IMG_9144

 

 

In the middle of nowhere, a little 12th century chapel suddenly appeared. For the

pilgrims in the Middle Ages, this chapel was for sure a great relief.

 

 

 

 

IMG_9145 (1)

 

Chapelle Notre-Dame de Lugaut

 

 

I had to pick up the key for the refuge in Roquefort at a bar.  I was the only one

staying overnight in the big house.  A plate of fruit on the dining room table and

flowers on each nightstand showed that the people really cared for this place.

I loved the medieval character of the town.

 

 

 

 

IMG_9170 (1)

 

View to the 12th century church Église Notre Dame de l’Assomption

 

 

 

Many people before me stayed overnight at the refuge.  To my joy, I discovered in the

pilgrim’s book the inscription of Emeline, the woman I met on the second day in

Saint Reverien.  Several days ago, she was at the same refuge.

 

 

 

IMG_9166 (1)

 

 

 

 

 

- Text and photos contributed by Garyo -

 

 

 

 

 

 

Posted in Pilgrimage | Leave a comment

Pilgrimage to Santiago de Compostela: Day 32

 

 

 

 

DAY THIRTYTWO

LA-FERME  -  BAZAS

 

 

Without opening your door

You can open your heart

Without looking out your window

You can see the essence of Tao.

                                                            Lao Tse

 

 

At 9 in the morning we were starting for Cadillac, a town 19 miles west from La-

Ferme. Here we found out that the pilgrim’s way was no longer going through this

town.  My guidebook, published 2012, had not recorded this change.  In total, Jean

Paul drove over two hours to drop me off on the marked way. His generosity and

helpfulness were amazing.

 

It was a beautiful walk to Bazas. The rain filled the air with a heavy dampness and

put a great stillness over the meadows and fields. It was just great to walk, to breath,

to be.

 

 

 

IMG_9020

 

 

 

 

 

IMG_9016 (1)

 

 

 

 

IMG_9024

 

 

I entered Bazas through the old city gate and came soon to a very picturesque city

plaza with the 13th century Gothic church Cathédral Saint-Jean-Baptiste. Instead of

statues, little children were sitting in the niches of the entrance to the church.  I loved

the replacement of the former statues with happy children.  When I entered the

church, I saw high up in the apsis of the church, standing on scaffolding, a man

renovating the heart shaped stained glass window frame.  I was touched by the magic

of this site.

 

 

 

 

IMG_9034

 

City gate of Bazas

 

 

 

 

IMG_9054

 

City plaza of Bazas with the Gothic church

 

 

 

 

IMG_9047

 

    Children climbing up to the niches of the entrance to the church

 

 

 

 

IMG_9037

 

                      Stained glass window in the apsis of the church facing east

 

 

 

 

IMG_9057

 

Gothic arcades at the plaza of Bazar

 

 

After having a Bhoudi tea in the café under the Gothic arcades, I walked to the

refuge, the Château Saint-Vincent owned by Madame and Monsieur Dumortier.

They bought this Château for their retirement days. He was a professional carpenter

and she is an artist.  Both love to renovate.  This Château gives them plenty to do.

 

 

 

 

IMG_9059 (1)

 

Château Saint-Vincent

 

 

 

 

IMG_9063 (1)

 

Madame and Monsieur Dumortier in the kitchen

Text and photos contributed by Garyo -

 

 

 

 

Posted in Pilgrimage | Leave a comment