Pilgrimage to Santiago de Compostela: Day 27

 

 

 

DAY TWENTYSEVEN

SORGES – PÉRIGUEUX

 

 

Sorge is the capital of truffles; it even has a truffle museum.  Fenced in oak forests on

the way to Périgueux showed how valuable truffles are.

 

 

 

 

IMG_8474

 

 

 

This day, I only had fourteen miles to walk and like always, passed beautiful sites.

 

 

 

 

IMG_8469

 

 

 

 

 

IMG_8484

 

 

                                                 Draw well

 

 

In walking through the Forest “Forêt Lanmary” I discovered a castle, which seemed

to be in a deep sleep for centuries.  There was nobody around and everything was

firmly locked up.  It was a strange feeling peeking into the past with no life anymore

in it.

 

 

 

 

IMG_8506

 

 

 

When I arrived in the city of Perigueux, which has approximately 30,000

inhabitants, the difference between past and present was amazing.  There were so

many tourists visiting this town. The historical sites of Perigueux reach back to

Gallo-Roman times.  The most fascinating monument of the past for me was the

temple of the Gallic goddess “Vesunna.”

 

 

 

 

 

IMG_8575 (1)

 

Temple of Vesunna

 

 

After the Romans invaded the Celtic people, they erected their own monuments and

temples.  Beside the left over of an amphitheater, other ruins of the Roman times can

be seen.

 

 

 

IMG_8520

 

                             Remains of a Roman temple

 

 

During the peak of the pilgrimage to Santiago, Perigueux became a famous

pilgrimage town.  Two churches speak about this time – the 12th century

Cathédral Saint-Front and the even older church Eglise Saint-Etienne de la Cité.

In visiting the Church Saint-Etienne, I felt very uncomfortable.  It was dark

and dreary; even the organ music did not change this feeling.

 

 

 

 

IMG_8539

 

                              Église Saint-Etienne de la Cité

 

 

The Cathedral Saint-Front reminded me of St. Marcus in Venice and the Hagia

Sophia in Istanbul.  It had a Byzantine influence; its space was enormous.  But,

somehow, my enthusiasm for historical buildings had vanished that day. Not even

the cheery whiteness of the town – all the buildings and streets were built of the

local white limestone – lifted my spirits. It was my last day with Rohan and Eddy

and I felt somehow exhausted from the many days of walking. Just before I arrived

Perigueux, I got lost again and had to walk 3 extra miles on a busy road.  I was

considering the idea of stopping all together and, instead, visiting Thich Nhat Hanh’s

Plum Village, which was not far from Perigueux.

 

 

 

 

P1110827

 

                Side entrance of the Cathedral Saint-Front

 

 

 

 

P1110828 (1)

 

                 Main entrance to the Cathedral Saint-Front

 

 

 

 

P1110837

 

                         One of many street cafes in Perigueux

 

 

-Text and photos contributed by Garyo -

 

 

 

Posted in Pilgrimage | Leave a comment

Pilgrimage to Santiago de Compostela: Day 26

 

 

 

DAY TWENTYSIX

LA COQUILLE – SORGES

 

 

     An ancient path

     a frog jumps in

     the splash of water

                                           Basho

 

 

Since Châlus, I was in the region of Périgord, a district divided into four areas, each

identified with the four colors white, black, red and green. The part I was walking

through was the Périgord verd (green) because of its abundant vegetation.

 

For lunch I stopped in Thivier.  Jean-Paul-Sartre lived in this town until he was six

years old.  He had only bad memories about this place. He described his experience

in his book “Les Mots” (the words).

 

 

 

 

IMG_8361

 

                Thivier seen from the place I had lunch

 

 

In Thivier, I had to make a decision – either choose the shorter route to Sorges on

the Road Napoleon, a straight road Napoleon ordered to be built for the military, or

walk the traditional route, which is longer and nicer.  I decided to walk the traditional

way. Although I was exhausted at the end of the day – having walked 21 miles - I did

not regret it.

 

 

 

 

IMG_8386

 

                                    Quiet forest roads

 

 

 

 

IMG_8387

 

                                    Meadows with poppies

 

 

 

 

IMG_8400

 

                                    Fields of sunflowers

 

 

 

 

IMG_8390

 

                                             Vinyards

 

 

When I arrived at the refuge in Sorges, Eddy and Rohan were already there.  They

took the Route Napoleon.  Anna-Marie, a volunteer from Paris, managed the refuge.

She cooked a delicious meal for us.  The Andalusian Paella was especially delicious.

 

 

 

 

IMG_8446

 

            Anna-Marie in the kitchen of the refuge                                                                    with Rohan and Eddy

 

 

 

 

IMG_8450

 

                         Andalusian Paella, a rice dish

 

 

The church was also a special treat. Modern light installations and excellent

renovation techniques made it to a very special place

 

 

 

 

P1110623

 

                                     Church of Sorges

 

 

 

 

IMG_8440

 

                         Interior of the church in Sorges

 

 

 

- Text and photos contributed by Garyo -

 

 

 

Posted in Pilgrimage | Leave a comment

Pilgrimage to Santiago de Compostela: Day 25

 

 

 

DAY TWENTYFIVE

FLAVIGNAC- LA COQUILLE

 

 

For the one with the mind

not flowing out, the thoughts

not scattered, right and wrong

discarded, and wakeful,

there is no fear

                                                  Dhammapada

 

 

This day was a day of walking through meadows, forests and fields. Quiet lakes were

scattered in between with trees being reflected on the surface.  It was great just to

walk.

 

 

 

 

IMG_8230 (1)

 

 

 

 

 

IMG_8246

 

 

 

 

 

IMG_8333

 

 

 

In front of a cherry tree, the owner of the house placed a chair for the hikers with

the invitation to use it for rest.

 

 

 

 

IMG_8262

 

 

 

 

 

IMG_8261

 

      Hikers, you have earned a rest

 

 

Around noon, I arrived in the charming little town, Châlus, where the English king

Richard Lionheart died during a battle over the castle in 1199.  This was a big

surprise for me. Not only was I following the footsteps of Richard Lionheart by

starting my pilgrimage in Vezelay, but also, an Austrian Duke captured Richard

Lionheart when he passed Vienna and put him into prison in the castle of Dürnstein,

near where I am from.   There was a connection between the past and the present.

 

 

 

 

IMG_8266

 

    Town of Châlus with the road up to the castle

 

 

When I walked up to the castle, its big entrance door was locked.  I did not see any

way to visit the place.  Suddenly, a girl came with a key.  She was the tour guide of the

castle and opened the place for the first time in the season.  Her name was Charlotte

and she gave me a tour.

 

 

 

 

IMG_8269

 

Charlotte opening the door

 

 

 

IMG_8310 (1)

 

      Former castle of Châlus

 

 

 

After King Lionheart’s death -as it was common practice for the aristocracy during

the Middle Ages - his body was divided up. His entrails were buried in the castle of

Châlus, his embalmed heart in the Cathedral of Notre Dame in Rouen, and the rest

of his body was buried in the Fontevraud Abbey beside his father.

 

 

 

 

IMG_8283

 

On the ground to the right of the walk way, The lying statue of Richard Lionheart.

 

 

 

After I left the town, my mind was occupied with the story of Richard Lionheart and

the chain of events, which lead to his early death. At one point on the Way, I had to

decide if I wanted to ignore the local signs of forbidding me to enter a clearly marked

way of the pilgrimage or not.  It was very confusing. I decided to follow the shell –

and really got lost. It was an old sign nobody had removed. At the end, I reached the

common Way again, but with a big detour.  It was nice that Eddy and Rohan called to

find out where I was. I arrived in La Coquille in late afternoon. La Coquille means

shell in French.

 

 

 

 

IMG_8338

 

         The blocked Way I ignored.

 

 

 

- Text and photos contributed by Garyo -

 

 

 

Posted in Pilgrimage | Leave a comment

Pilgrimage to Santiago de Compostela: Day 24

 

 

 

DAY TWENTYFOUR

LIMOGES – FLAVIGNAC

 

 

      Cool breeze

      tangled

      in a grass blade

                                    Issa

 

 

As I walked out of the town of Limoge, I passed the marketplace, the old train station

and the Église Saint-Michel-des Lions, a 14th century Gothic hall church.

By entering the church, I was welcomed by the warm light and air of uncountable

burning candles and the smell of incense. Dim morning light was falling through the

huge stained glass windows. The space was magical.  I learned that the 3rd century

Roman Saint Martial is buried here.  He brought Christianity to the Roman town,

then called Augustoritum.

 

 

 

 

IMG_8134

 

                              Église Saint-Michel-des-Lions

 

 

It took me two hours to leave the city.  Allies of oak trees were walking with me.

Later on, there were hardly any villages along the way.  In the little town Aixe-sur-

Vienne, I visited the workshop of a basket maker. A painting on a wooden door

shows that it is still 1,349 km (838 miles) to Santiago de Compostela.

 

 

 

 

IMG_8168

 

                              Workshop of the basketmaker

 

 

In the refuge of Flavignac, I met Rohan and Eddy again.  They did the typical errands

of the pilgrims at the end of each day – washing laundry, caring for the feet and

writing a diary.

 

 

 

 

IMG_8220

 

   Rohan and Eddy writing the diary in front of the refuge

 

 

The village of Flavignac has not only a restaurant and a boulangerie but also a tiny

delicatesse grocery store, which is at the same time a café and a photo studio and a

book store.

 

 

 

 

IMG_8204

 

                      Proud owner with family of the Épicerie

 

 

- Text and photos contributed by Garyo -

 

 

 

 

Posted in Pilgrimage | Leave a comment

Pilgrimage to Santiago de Compostela: Day 23

 

 

 

DAY TWENTYTHREE

SAINT-LEONARD-DE-NOBLAT  -  LIMOGE

 

 

How could we discuss this and that

Without knowing that the world

Is reflected in a single pearl

      

                                                 Ryokan

 

 

By crossing the river Vienne on the 13th century bridge Pont de Noblat, we left the

city and came into the rural area again – a hilly contryside with fields of wheat, forests

with blooming sweet chestnut trees, mills and stonewalls overgrown with moss.

We left the town together and I continued later at my own speed – a pattern that

developed until we departed a few days later in Périgueux.

 

 

 

 

IMG_7939

 

        View from the 13th century bridge Pont de Noblat

 

 

 

 

IMG_7950

 

                         Little settlement with a grape vine

 

 

 

 

IMG_7960

 

                               Growing on the stone façade

 

 

The Way was not always a clear line to the west and twice I thought I got lost –

only to discover that I was on the right way anyway. Like so often on the Way,

I passed ancient stone crosses, a sign of the pilgrimage route in the past.

 

 

 

 

IMG_7980

 

                                           Path with Cross

 

 

I arrived Limoge on a Sunday afternoon and entered the old town of Limoge via the

oldest bridge of the whole Via Lemovicensis, the Roman bridge Saint Martial.

Limoge is known for the highly sophisticated medieval enamel production, for the

music school St. Martial founded in the 11th century and for the Limoge porcelain.

 

 

 

 

IMG_8028

 

                           Pont Martial with 2 painters

 

 

 

 

IMG_8034 (1)

 

   2 people painting a window with old military figurines

 

 

The town was pretty empty at the weekend.  All the people seemed to have gathered

along the river Vienne where a festival was going on.

 

 

 

 

IMG_8006

 

                                 Plaza in the old town

 

 

For the night, I stayed in the convent of the order of the Franciscan sisters, which was

a very beautiful place. I was especially intrigued by the spiral stairway leading up to

my room.

 

 

 

 

IMG_8008

 

                     Convent “Soeurs Saint-François d’Assise”

 

 

 

 

IMG_8104

 

                   Spiral Stairway up to the guest rooms of the Franciscan convent

 

 

Looking out from my window of the convent, I had a perfect view to the 13th century

Gothic Cathedral Saint-Etienne.  Because of a heavy thunderstorm, the gargoyles

surrounding the roofline were spitting water out of their big mouths.

 

 

 

 

IMG_8093

 

                   Cathedral Saint Etienne in the evening sun                    with a heavy thunderstorm approaching

 

 

 

 

P1110351

 

                        Gargoyles at the north facade

 

 

When I entered the Gothic Cathedral, the huge space was filled with organ music.  I

loved to just listen to these powerful tones.  A row of little angles over the west portal

and a modern sculpture of the Black Madonna were especially catching my attention.

 

 

 

 

IMG_8039

 

                      Row of angles at the western gallery

 

 

 

 

IMG_8048 (1)

 

              Black Madonna in the Cathedral St. Etienne

 

 

- Text and photos contributed by Gary -

 

 

 

 

Posted in Pilgrimage | Leave a comment

Pilgrimage to Santiago de Compostela: Day 22

 

 

 

DAY TWENTYTWO

BILLANGES  -  SAINT-LÉONARD-DE-NOBLAT

 

 

What day are we?

We are every day, my friend

We are the whole of live, my love….

                                                 

                                                          Jaques Prévert

 

 

It was a rainy morning when we left Billanges. Against the grey sky, the green leaves

of trees and shrubs were shining in a saturated, deep green.  It was a feast for the eye.

We walked over paved streets and small forest ways and passed an abandoned

looking palace.  In a forest, we came up to a decorated tree trunk, the “tronc du

pelerin”.  This tree trunk was decorated with all kinds of objects people left on their

way to Santiago.  We had great fun to look at all these different things.

 

 

 

 

IMG_7787

 

                  Pont du Dognon over the river Taurion

 

 

 

 

IMG_7800

 

 

 

 

P1110154

 

                                     Le tronc du pelerin

 

 

 

 

IMG_7806

 

Le tronc du pelerine with the inscription“Ultreia”. It means “onward and upward”  and was used by the medieval pilgrims as a greeting phrase.

 

 

Rohan was always walking in the front.  Although he suffered from Asthma this day,

his speed was faster than I normally walk.  In hiking up a muddy path one time, I felt

a sudden sharp pain in my left calf.  My leg was cramped and I hardly could walk any

more.  I asked Eddy and Rohan to continue the trek and I would slowly follow.  After

a while my leg relaxed.  From then on, I walked at my own speed.

 

Sometimes, I came across conflicting signs.  Usually, I ignored the local signs and

followed the symbol of the Way to Santiago.

 

 

 

 

IMG_7796

 

 

 

 

 

IMG_7848

 

                                    Conflicting symbols

 

 

The refuge I stayed at in Saint-Léonard-de-Noblat was right in the center of the city.

Here I met Eddy and Rohan again.  St. Léonard is a medieval city where old and new

is often perfectly blending together.

 

 

 

 

IMG_7878

 

                               House with Gothic facade

 

 

 

 

IMG_7858

 

            Fresh fruit and vegetables sold in the street

 

 

The town is famous for the church Église Saint-Léonard, an 11th century church

dedicated by the UNESCO as a World Heritage Site.  It contains the grave of St.

Léonard, the patron saint of prisoners.  At one time, the church was filled with prison

chains donated by former prisoners.  Now, there is only one chain mounted over the

grave of the Saint and no candle burning in front of his grave.  He was one of the

most popular saints in the medieval ages and many churches all over Europe were

dedicated to him.

 

 

 

 

IMG_7893

 

                Apsis with side chapels of Église Saint Léonard

 

 

 

 

IMG_7872

 

 

 

 

 

IMG_7873

 

                                Grave of Saint-Léonard

 

 

To my great surprise, in one of the side chapels, I saw a model of a church I know

very well. It was the church Sankt Leonhard in the little village of Altaussee in Austria.

 

 

IMG_7868

 

                       Model of the church in Austria

 

 

 

- Text and photos contributed by Garyo -

 

 

 

 

 

Posted in Pilgrimage | Leave a comment

Pilgrimage to Santiago de Compostela: Day 21

 

 

 

DAY TWENTYONE

BÉNÉVENT-L’ABBEYE   -   BILLANGES

 

 

It was great!  I did not have to look for the way as Rohan took the lead and I was

following him. No worry anymore about getting lost.  Eddy was a fast walker and

always waited a bit until he could walk at his own speed.  We were a great team as

we shared our love for silence, beauty and for just walking.

 

 

 

 

IMG_7656 (1)

 

                  Eddy and Rohan looking for the Way

 

 

Our path took us up the highest peak of the Via Lemovicensis, to the 2,192 feet high

village of Saint-Goussaud.  In front of the 12th century church, we met three Dutch

pilgrims on the way to Santiago de Compostela.  One of them did not carry a back-

pack but pulled a two-wheeled chart behind him.

 

 

 

 

IMG_7610 (1)

 

                        Rohan, Eddy and 3 Dutch pilgrims

 

 

Saint - Goussaud was a Roman settlement and got its name from the Roman hermit

Goussaud, who once lived in this area.  He is known for his love for animals.

 

When we left the village, we followed an ancient Roman road down the mountain.

Trees covered with thick moss were lining up along the path like Roman soldiers.

Silence was surrounding us.  It seemed that time stood still.

 

 

 

 

IMG_7618 (1)

 

                                               Roman Road

 

 

 

 

IMG_7629

 

                                    Sweet chestnut tree

 

 

 

 

IMG_7627

 

                 Ancient stone wall covered with moss

 

 

At a charming little settlement, we took a rest and had lunch.  A young lady filled my

water bottle. Her white pet rat was lovingly crawling on her shoulder and she allowed

me to take a photo of it.

 

 

 

 

IMG_7650

 

 

 

 

 

IMG_7653

 

 

 

 

 

IMG_7648

 

 

 

 

When we arrived at the refuge in Billanges, Francois, the owner, was not at home.

She left the house open for us.  We were told by Yves just to enter and we were

immediately surrounded by pure creativity.  Everything in her house was unique -

it was unbelievable.  Later on, Francois showed us her studio.  She is not only

a professional porcelain painter, but also does prints, paintings and sculptures.

 

 

 

 

 

IMG_7673

 

House of François

 

 

 

 

P1110051

 

                          Inside of the house of François

 

 

 

In the evening, she prepared a delicious meal for us – Spaghetti a la Francois, a big

bowl of fresh salad from her garden, sweet melon and a carafe of French Red Country

Wine.  Like in every refuge, we got a pilgrim’s stamp in our pilgrim’s pass.

The pilgrim’s pass is a requirement for being able to stay overnight in a refuge.

 

 

 

 

IMG_7772 (1)

 

                  François stamping our pilgrim’s passes

 

 

 

- Text and Photos contributed by Garyo -

 

 

 

 

Posted in Pilgrimage | Leave a comment

Pilgrimage to Santiago de Compostela: Day 20

 

 

 

DAY TWENTY

LA SOUTERRAINE – BÉNÉVENT-L’ABBEY

 

 

In late morning, I started the trek to the Bénévent-L’Abbey, a town fourteen miles

away from La Souterraine.  With each step I took, I felt better.  Walking in nature is

meditation for me; it connects me with something bigger than myself - with the

bigger Self.

 

 

 

IMG_7474

 

 

 

 

IMG_6589

 

 

 

 

IMG_7472

 

 

 

 

IMG_7482

 

                                   Curious Limousin cattle

 

 

Picturesque Gothic window decorations and an old, deteriorating mill greeted me

like old friends.

 

 

 

 

IMG_7489

 

House façade in the village Le Bec Moulin de Châtelus

 

 

 

 

IMG_7495

 

                                     Moulin de Châtelus

 

 

 

 

IMG_7496

 

Millstream of the Moulin de Châtelus

 

 

In the west, dark clouds had formed and soon I was surrounded by thunder,

lightening and heavy rain. It was like the tension of last week was taken over by

the sky and released by this powerful thunderstorm. I loved the soft sound of the

raindrops falling on my red rain cape, the warm drops on my face and the walk

through the rain puddles on the ground.

 

 

 

 

IMG_7499

 

 

 

At 6pm, I arrived at the refuge in Bénévent-l’Abbay.  The refuge was a charming

house owned by Yves and his wife Thérese.  Yves was a retired psychiatrist and

Thérese worked in the psychiatric hospital in La Souterraine.  Both share a love

for donkeys.  Their refuge is called Adosdanes. It refers to the donkeys they provide

with a kind of retirement shelter in old age.  The seven donkeys are named Nana,

Spirou, Romeo, Bijou, Chocolat, Margarite and Capucine.

 

 

 

 

IMG_7526

 

                                       Refuge Adosdanes

 

 

 

 

IMG_7536

 

                 Pilgrimage sign in front of the refuge

 

 

In addition to the warm welcome and the fantastic meal Yves and Thérese cooked,

I also met two Belgium pilgrims here, Eddy and Rohan.  We decided to walk together

the next day, as the way Yves was suggesting was different from what was suggested

in my book.

 

 

 

 

IMG_7503

 

Yves and Thérese serving wine mixed with cassis as aperitif

 

 

 

- Text and photos contributed by Garyo -

 

 

 

 

 

Posted in Pilgrimage | Leave a comment

Pilgrimage to Santiago de Compostela: Days 13 – 19

 

 

 

DAY THIRTEEN – DAY NINETEEN

WRITING WORKSHOP, FERME VILLEFAVARD

 

 

Exhausted, I sought 

a country inn, but found

wisteria in bloom

                                        Matsuo Basho

 

 

For years, I wanted to do a creative writing workshop with Natalie Goldberg.

I was reading her books and did many of her exercises.  This winter, I met her

for the first time at a Ryokan workshop in Santa Fe. I was excited to be able to

spend one week with her.

 

Shortly before the workshop started in Villefavard, I heard the sad news that Natalie

became seriously sick with chronic lymphatic leukemia and could not come. I was

very disappointed.  But I went, nevertheless - and did not regret it.  She was there –

through her students, her structure of the course and her past teaching style.

 

 

 

2014 06 24 SWW Villefavard-179

 

          Performance hall transformed into a Zendo

 

 

Natalie Goldberg was a student from Katagiri Roshi. Many of her ideas come from

the practice of Zen.  The basics of her workshops are staying in silence, writing and

reading with a nonjudgmental mind and getting the monkey mind out of the way.

For that, she suggests keeping the pen moving until the specific writing time is over.

I love these exercises.

 

 

 

2014 06 21 Villefavard-96 (1)

 

  My own writing exercise in front of the little Zen garden

 

 

In the morning, we started with meditation.  The evening meditation was in the

garden overlooking a lake and a meadow with gazing cows in the distance.

 

 

 

 

2014 06 19 Villefavard-17-Edit

 

                         Meditation in the evening sun

 

 

Writing alone and sharing with the group was an essential part.  Sometimes,

we made up our own exercises, like reading passages from three different books.

 

 

 

 

2014 06 18 Villefavard-117

 

Rebecca, Jody and I, reading aloud passages of three books

 

 

The workshop contained challenges for me.  Past emotional difficulties were rising up

from the unconscious, together with unhealthy thinking patterns.  At the end of the

workshop, I got a severe headache, had a bad cold and felt very weak.  I was afraid

that I could not continue my pilgrimage.  But there was Erica, my “angel”, who

helped me on the last seminar day not to give up.  Her knowledge as a medical doctor

was extremely helpful and she gave me lots of her own herbal medicine.

 

(Kevin S. Moul took all photos for the Natalie Goldberg seminar)

 

 

                           - Text contributed by Garyo -

 

 

 

 

 

Posted in Pilgrimage | Leave a comment

Pilgrimage to Santiago de Compostela: Day 12

 

 

 

DAY TWELVE

LA SOUTERRAINE – VILLEFAVARD

 

Again

I sneak into your garden

To eat aronia berries 

(please keep yourself hidden 

until I go away)

                                                           Ryokan

 

 

La Souterraine got its name from the crypt underneath the 12th Century

Romanesque church.  Even before the Romans settled here, the Celtic people

venerated Sosterranea, the Goddess of the earth, at this place. Unfortunately,

the crypt was closed due to renovation. Therefore, I had time to wander around

through the town before the shuttle was to pick me up for Villefavard.

 

 

 

 

IMG_7464

 

                                Market beside the church

 

 

 

 

IMG_7284

 

                          Porte Saint-Jean, 13th century

 

 

Ferme Villefavard is a farm founded in the middle of the 19th century by a Swiss

Huguenot Family. It is now a center for all kinds of artistic and creative disciplines –

mainly music, dance, theatre and also for creative writing.  When I arrived,

I immediately loved the place.  It had a lot of similarities with the farm I grew up

on in Austria.

 

 

 

 

IMG_7358

 

                    The barn of the farm, now transformed into a performance hall

 

In the right corner of the huge courtyard, there were two little Zen gardens. This was

my favorite place to stay.

 

 

 

 

IMG_7393

 

                               Rock garden of Villefavard

 

 

 

 

IMG_7302

 

 

 

 

 

IMG_7348

 

                      Walkway from “La Solitude” to the farm

 

 

 

Beside rooms in the farm building, there were different houses where guests could

stay.

I stayed in a house called “La Solitude.” In the living room, there was black grand

piano where I loved playing my own music notes at times when nobody could hear

me.

 

 

 

 

IMG_7322

 

                                                    Chateau

 

 

 

 

IMG_7308

 

                                               La Solitude

 

 

 

 

IMG_7418

 

     Living room of “La Solitude” with the Steinway piano

 

 

At the farm, only a few people were present.  Trains were on strike and many

participants got stuck in Paris. For me, this day was a day to rest and adjust to

a new environment.

 

 

 

                        – Text and photos contributed by Garyo -

 

 

 

 

Posted in Pilgrimage | Leave a comment