PILGRIMAGE: CAMINO PRIMITIVO, DAY 20, LIRES – MUXIA

 

 

 

Until the evening, heavy mist covered the coastline to Muxia.  I was so thankful for that. Often the path went through Eucalyptus forests, the most common tree along the coast and through lush, green vegetation.

 

 

 

 

IMG_3145

 

Crossing the river on a new bridge built in 2011

Until then, pilgrims had to cross on stones laid down in the river.

 

 

 

 

IMG_3148

 

Mulleins (in German Königskerze, which means candle of the king)

 

 

 

 

IMG_3181

 

Well providing refreshing drinking water

 

 

 

 

IMG_3158

 

 

 

 

 

IMG_3171

 

Bottom part of a horreo (granary)

 

 

 

Muxia is located on the Costa da Morte, the coast of Death.  The name refers to the many shipwrecks along the coast.  The last was in 2002, when an oil tank was leaking 70 000 liter of oil into the Atlantic.

 

 

 

 

IMG_3187

 

 

 

 

 

 

IMG_3213

View from Monte Corpiño to the little fishing village Muxia (4, 500 inhabitants)

Already in the Pre-Christian time, the Celtic people considered Muxia a sacred place. Their worship was focused on the “Pedra de Alabar”, a huge curved rocking stone balanced on a point.  They celebrated fertility rituals at this place.

 

 

The Christian reinterpreted the stone as a sailing boat by the Virgin Mary and built the Church “Virxe da Barca” nearby.

 

 

 

 

IMG_3288

 

 

 

 

 

IMG_3298

 

Pedra de Alabar

 

 

 

 

IMG_3313

 

Virxe da Barca, Pedra de Alabar and the full moon in the east

 

 

 

 

IMG_3344

 

Symbols of the cemetery with full moon

 

 

Ending in Muxia the Camino Primitivo with the full moon was, like so often on this Camino, a magical experience.  When I was walking the Way, wonder and astonish-ment about the beauty all around me were constantly my companions. Meeting so many open, warmhearted people was a great experience.

All this filled my heart with gratefulness and joy.

 

Thank you very much for walking with me.

 

………………………………

 

We thank you, Garyo, again for our being able to walk with your walking step by step with beautiful hearts and scenes!

We are looking forward to walking with you again on the Shikoku 88 temples in Japan.

 

 

 

 

Posted in Camino Primitivo, Pilgrimage | Leave a comment

PILGRIMAGE: CAMINO PRIMITIVO, DAY 19, FISTERRE –LIRES

 

 

 

 

It was hard to leave the albergue this morning.  I was very tempted to stay one more night – but then, I would have been pressed for time and I still had to deal with my knee problem. I left late.  The temperature was climbing up to nearly 104 Fahrenheit, with often no shade.  It was a mistake. But the route was spectacular.  It was recommended by the author of my guidebook, Raimung Joos, whom I met just by coincidence in Santiago.  I followed his recommendation and did not regret it.

 

 

 

 

IMG_3065

 

Last house at the beach of Fisterre

 

 

 

 

IMG_3076

 

A donkey being shaved

 

 

The way between Fisterre and Muxia is walked in both directions.  Therefore, the shell points to the ground.  An arrow shows the direction to either to F or M. I liked this symbol, as it told me “you are right where you are right now.” I also liked the many snails, as I felt like a snail this day.

 

 

 

 

IMG_3078

 

 

 

The bay of Avela looked so gorgeous that I decided to walk the steep path down.  Originally, I wanted to jump into the cold water, but the currents were too dangerous.  It was peaceful down there, with only the many seagulls as my companions.

 

 

 

 

IMG_3087

 

 Bay of Amela

IMG_3093

IMG_3098

Bay of Amela with seagulls

 

 

 

 

 

IMG_3126

 

Every shade was a relief in this heat.

 

 

 

 

IMG_3112

 

Hórreo and an abundance of Hortensie

Very close to Lires, I arrived at the Bar del Playa with the gorgeous view to the bay.  Resting there from the heat of the day and having a cold drink was a pure treat. When I arrived in Lires, people were greeting me not with the usual “buen camino” but with “mucho color!” The heat was even too much for the Spanish people.

 

 

 

 

IMG_3135

 

Bar del Playa

 

 

 

 

IMG_3141

 

Having dinner with a new Maleen

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

IMG_3143

 

 

 

Posted in Camino Primitivo, Pilgrimage | Leave a comment

PILGRIMAGE: CAMINO PRIMITIVO, DAY 18, SANTIAGO DE COMPOSTELA – FISTERRE

 

 

 

In Celtic times and even before, Cape Finisterre was considered the “end of the world” and a major cultic place.  Often the medieval pilgrims continued their pilgrimage to Cape Finisterre.

At the coast, they collected the scallop as evidence that they had walked the entire Camino to the end of the world. Five years ago, I walked that extra 54 miles with my daughter.  This time I only hiked the last eight miles to Fisterre.

 

 

 

 

IMG_2926

 

People helping a pilgrim to find the way

 

 

 

 

IMG_2934

 

More old stone walls

 

 

Soon I walked along the coast and had a spectacular view to Cape Finisterre and the town Fisterre.

 

 

 

 

IMG_2958

 

View of the “end of the world”

 

 

 

 

IMG_2981

 

Typical Galician stone cross

 

 

I chose to stay at the albergue Do Sol.  It was the same place I stayed in five years ago.

It had not lost its charm and warmth.

 

 

 

 

IMG_2983

 

One of many writings in the albergue

 

 

 

 

IMG_3060

 

Poster in the albergue Do Sol

 

 

 

Cape Finisterre is half an hour walk away from town.  Many pilgrims go there to watch the sunset.  After two weeks of bad weather, the atmosphere was clear and brilliant. The sun was visible until it disappeared at the horizon. It looked as if it was sinking into the ocean. Everybody was watching it in silence.

 

 

Until recently, it was a tradition to burn a piece of clothing or shoes near the light tower.  However, after the whole hill caught fire one time, the tradition was forbidden, but not everybody is following this law – I saw the leftovers of some recently burned shoes.

 

 

 

 

IMG_2994

 

Light tower

 

 

 

 

IMG_3041

 

Granite boulders on the Cape

 

 

 

 

IMG_3000

 

 

 

 

 

IMG_3023

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Posted in Camino Primitivo, Pilgrimage | Leave a comment

PILGRIMAGE: CAMINO PRIMITIVO, DAYS 16 – 17,  MONTE DO GOZO – SANTIAGO DE COMPOSTELA

 

 

 

 

The history of Santiago de Compostela is closely connected with the “discovery” of the burial ground of St. James in 825.

However, this place had high cultic relevance already 3000 years ago and was used as a cultic place by Celtic and Roman people.

Besides Jerusalem and Rome, Santiago  is one of the most important Christian pilgrimage sites. Nowadays, most of the pilgrims walk for different reasons.

 

 

 

 

IMG_2756

 

Walking into the town

 

 

 

 

IMG_3356

 

Monastery San Martiño Pinario

 

 

 

My memory of Santiago from five years ago was not good – too many people, too much confusion. I was not looking forward to my arrival. However, it turned out to be different. This time, I saw the harmony and beauty of the town. Every step brought a new surprise, a new viewpoint. The angles of the buildings constantly changed; there was movement in the stability of this heavy rock.  Many musicians played at different places and corners – often they played the bagpipe, the traditional Galician instrument. This added to the vitality of this town.

 

 

 

 

IMG_2830

 

Arco de Palacio leading to Plaza de Obradoirol

 

 

 

 

IMG_3352

 

Musicians under the walkway of the Palacio Gelmirez,

 

 

 

The old town of Santiago de Compostela is completely built out of granite.  For hundreds of years, stone workers from all over Europe worked on the huge place in front of the Cathedral (Plaza del Obradoiro) to cut granite for the many different buildings.  The sculptors cut out of the hard granite most delicate figures visible on doorways and facades.

 

 

 

 

IMG_2839

 

Plaza de las Platerias (silversmith), south entrance of the Cathedral

 

 

 

 

IMG_2793

 

King David by Master Esteban (13th century),

Part of the Romanesque doorway on the south side.

 

 

 

 

IMG_2872

 

 

 

 

 

IMG_3472

 

View from the interior court of the university to the different towers of the Cathedral

 

 

 

 

IMG_3466

 

Inner court of the university

 

 

 

 

IMG_3456

 

 

 

In order to get the Compostela, a certificate of having walked without interruption the last 62 miles to Santiago, the pilgrim has to show the pilgrim’s passport.  The lines to get the certificate are often long.

 

 

 

 

IMG_2806

 

Long line of pilgrims in front of the Office de Peregrinos

 

 

 

The Cathedral of Santiago in its recent appearance goes back to the 12th century. It was planned for the masses of pilgrims, who needed and wanted to spend the night in the church – there was nothing else around. In order to clean body and soul, the 80kg heavy incense burner (largest in the world) called Botafumeiro was installed a few centuries later.

 

 

 

Just by coincidence, I entered the church when they started to swing the Botafumeiro.  The smell was magical. A nun was singing one of my favorite songs, a simple Latin melody of “Ubin Caritas et Amor” (where charity and love are), a song my family was singing at the grave of my mother.  I was deeply touched.  Hugging the 12th century statue of St. James is also a tradition I followed.  However, in my mind, I hugged the hugs of the millions of people who had been there in the past. This was for me the special experience.

 

 

 

 

IMG_3593

 

Transept of the Cathedral

 

 

 

 

IMG_3583

 

Botafumeiro swang by the tiraboleiros to reach the vaults of the transept

 

 

 

IMG_3568

 

 

Starting the burning of the incense

 

 

 

 

IMG_3569

 

Botafumeiro

 

 

 

There are many culinary possibilities in Santiago.  In the evening, I went to the restaurant Casa Manolo.  Just by coincidence, I met a group of pilgrim friends I got to know on the Camino Primitivo.  Synchronicities are normal on the Camino.

 

 

 

 

IMG_2881

 

Casa Manolo, one of many restaurants for pilgrims

 

 

 

 

IMG_2878

 

Tarta de Santiago, an almond cake

 

 

 

Last year,  238,000 pilgrims from all over the world came to Santiago de Compostela.

People living in this town seem not to be affected by this stream of pilgrims.  They follow their traditions – like going shopping to the market.

 

 

 

 

IMG_3519

 

 

 

 

 

IMG_3505

 

 

 

 

 

IMG_3460

 

Silhouette of the Cathedral

 

 

 

 

IMG_3478

 

Plaza Obradeiro with the Hostal de los Reyes Católicos

 

 

Posted in Camino Primitivo, Pilgrimage | Leave a comment

PILGRIMAGE: CAMINO PRIMITIVO, DAY 15, RAS – MONTE DEL GOZO

 

 

 

Although my knee wanted a rest, I did not want to stay in one of the many albergue for a whole day.

There was a pull forward, a stream, in which I was swimming like all the other pilgrims.

Also, the place I stayed overnight was unpleasant and I was happy that I could leave it in the morning.

 

 

In general, the villages I passed were nice and well kept.  However, often the path was on the street.

 

 

 

IMG_2652

 

 

 

IMG_2660

 

Another pair of shoes left on the way

IMG_2662

 

 

 

 

 

IMG_2664

 

Oak forest overgrown with evergreens

 

 

 

 

IMG_2665

 

An interesting installation

 

 

 

With the masses of pilgrims, also the sayings, symbols and messages for other pilgrims increased. In one tunnel underneath a highway, many pilgrims wrote down their thoughts. One message, written in big letters was  – ”Now what?”

 

 

 

 

IMG_2689

 

A message I could not read

 

 

 

 

IMG_2670

 

Many crosses on the airport fence

 

 

 

 

IMG_2692

 

 

 

Before reaching the hill of Monte do Gozo, I passed the village of Labacolla.  At the intersection of two creeks, the medieval pilgrims washed themselves before walking into Santiago.

 

I decided not to rush to Santiago this day (I could not rush anyway) but to stay, like the pilgrims of the past, on Monte do Gozo, the mountain of Joy.

The place I stayed had 25 buildings with 3000 beds.  However, the sleeping rooms had only 5 beds and were clean.  I also could wash my clothes and dry them in the sun, since I arrived early enough in the day.

 

 

 

 

IMG_2704

 

Modern religious sculpture on Monte do Gozo with a group of bikers in front of it

 

 

 

 

IMG_2729

 

Statues of pilgrims greeting Santiago

 

 

 

 

 

Posted in Camino Primitivo, Pilgrimage | Leave a comment

PILGRIMAGE: CAMINO PRIMITIVO, DAY 14, MELIDE – RAS

 

 

 

Already in early morning, masses of pilgrims where pushing forward toward Santiago. I had to let go of the solitude of the past two weeks.  But a different energy replaced the silence and peacefulness – it was the energy of many joyful, open- hearted, happy people. The pilgrims came from all over the world. I was very surprised to see so many Asian people, especially Koreans.  Five years ago, I met only one Asian, a Japanese pilgrim.

 

 

 

 

IMG_2482

 

Leaving Melide in the early morning

 

 

 

 

IMG_2486

 

Morning light on a chapel in Melide

 

 

 

 

IMG_2501

 

Entrance portal of the Romanesque church Santa Maria

 

 

 

At an old, public washing place, I saw for the first time ever somebody using one.  This woman had a lot of fun washing her cloth.

 

 

 

 

IMG_2505

 

 

 

The typical forests in Galicia are Eucalyptus forests, a tree imported from Australia.

Although they are not good for the environment, especially because they replaced

the native trees, walking through an Eucalyptus forest when the mist is dissolving

the contours of the trees is a very nice experience.

 

 

 

 

IMG_2514

 

 

 

This day, I met Austrians for the first time  – Verena and Andreas from Styria.   It is their profession to document their treks with photos and films and talk about them at home.

 

 

 

 

IMG_2528

 

 

 

 

On the Camino Frances, there are many restaurants, cafes, and bars. Since the last 5 years when I was there, many new, fancy places have popped up.  They did not fit into the image of the Camino I carried in my mind.

 

 

 

 

IMG_2530

 

New cafe

 

 

 

Although the Camino provides a training place to wind down, to trust the Way and to trust that everything is perfect that is happening right now, many pilgrims are not able to step into this mindset.  Now, their competitiveness is focused on getting into the best albergue and getting there early enough for a space.  In the photo down below, already at noon a huge line of people is sitting in front of the albergue waiting to get a bed for the night.

 

 

 

 

 

 

IMG_2564

 

Albergue in Arzúa

 

 

 

 

 

IMG_2571

 

One of many fountains with fresh drinking water

Now, many people do not carry their heavy backpack, but only a day bag. They use a special service to transport their bag to the next albergue.

 

 

 

 

IMG_2580

 

 

 

 

 

IMG_2592

 

Two students from South Carolina

 

 

 

The whole day, I had to walk slowly.  My right knee was revolting and hurting.

I had to take a pain pill to be able to walk.  Towards the evening, when I was limping

through the woods, an even more limping old man came towards me. He was a

returning pilgrim walking back to his home in Slowenia.  He told me that he went

on this pilgrimage for his friend, who was killed in the war.  I gave him a donation,

which he gladly accepted.

 

 

 

 

IMG_2610

 

 

 

 

 

IMG_2609

 

Slowenian pilgrim

 

 

 

 

IMG_2621

 

One of many messages on the Camino

 

 

 

 

IMG_2618

 

 

 

 

Posted in Camino Primitivo, Pilgrimage | Leave a comment

Renouncing Home, Home Country, Karma Kinetics

 

Good morning!

 

We seem to taste the early fall weather after some rain. Especially after our sittings

and service, we have now a quiet, cool, calm, and clear world. Last night I watched

an award-winning film titled The Burmese Harp. The story runs like this:

 

Private Mizushima played the harp to accompany a Japanese soldier group

fleeing Burma to Thailand, a no war zone, led by Captain Inoue who conducted

their chorus on the way. One night while they were singing Home Sweet Home 

in a village, they were surrounded by British soldiers, who instead of raiding

them, joined their chorus. They were told that WWII had ended and so they

surrendered. Mizushima was dispatched to another fighting Japanese group to

tell them the war had ended and that they also should surrender. He was unable

to convince them in the time allotted, and when he tried to request additional

time using an improvised white flag, he was misunderstood by the group, who

had decided to fight to the end, and knocked unconscious by them.

 

 

He was the only survivor of the ensuing attack, and he was saved by a monk,

whom he robbed of his robe. He barely reached Mudon, where his group was

detained, saved by that robe (food, shelter, etc.). On the way he saw many

corpses and was determined to stay there to burn and bury them. He found a

red ruby, which villagers, who first simply watched his efforts to bury and then

helped him, told him is spirit. At the funeral procession he carried the Japanese

style white cloth cover of a cinerary urn. Inoue found the ruby in it when he was

taken to the charnel house to remove the urns. His group wanted him to return

to Japan with them and they taught a true parrot to say, “Mizushima, let’s go

back to Japan together.”

 

 

Inside the Buddha’s Nirvana statue, Mizushima played the harp to accompany

his group singing The Moon over the Ruined Castle outside. Despite their efforts

to get in he remained, having locked himself inside. With only three days remain-

ing before they were to leave for Japan, they started to sing aloud so that he

might come back to join them. They asked the old sales lady to give him the

parrot they had taught to speak. The day before they were to leave, he showed up

beyond the barbed wire fences and played Auld Lang Syne, whose translation 

ends, “Now is the time to part, Good bye!” and he went into the mist despite their

shouts for his return. Inoue received the parrot and a letter written by Mizushima

 which, having no time to read before leaving, he read in the boat for the group.

It told his story and decision to remain to put dead soldiers to rest, in peace. The

parrot said, “Alas, Mizushima can not go back with you.”

 

 

He was determined to leave his family and country to put those who were killed in

the war into peace. This is like the Buddha Gotama, who left his family, country, and

even the world to put all into peace who are in samsara suffering – birth, aging,

sickness, death, losing, parting from the beloved, meeting the hateful, in short,

the rampant racing of the five aggregates – through the Six Paths of hell beings,

hungry ghosts, fighting devils, human beings, and celestial beings.

 

Recently I forwarded Christian Appy’s article Our “Merciful” Ending to the “Good 

War,” or How Patriotism Means Never Having To Say You’re Sorry to our listserv. 

He mentioned the film Dr. Strangelove, the title character being Scientific Adviser to

the President of the U.S. The name seems to suggest his strange love of nukes and

that between the people chosen to survive the nuclear holocaust. Tom Engelhart in

his forward to this article mentioned the Single Integrated Operational Plan to

deliver more than two thousand nuclear warheads to more than a thousand targets

in more than a hundred cities in the Soviet Union, China, and communist countries

to kill more than three hundred million people. This is the “Specialists’ Folly” without

human hearts and minds.

 

The masses of mankind do the same in their business as usual – promoting

patriotism and wars, growth and devastation, global warming and extreme weather,

nuclear disaster and devastation, mass extinction and annihilation – all man-made

in madness. How can we stop this man-made MAD (Mutually Assured Destruction)

maniacism?

 

The Buddha said,

Better than conquering thousands upon thousands in the battlefield

Is conquering one-self. This is the true conqueror.

Such conquerors are not conquered by anything and conquer everything, anywhere,

any time. How can one conquer oneself? The Buddha showed us the “come and see”

way, good in the beginning, in the middle, and in the end for all. It is to sit still, still

karmas, see the Dharma of all dharmas, save and serve all beings. Anyone can attain

nirvana, stilling the wind of karmas, unconditioned peace, and bodhi, unsurpassed

awakening in it.

 

8/23/15

 

Note:

  1. The model of Mizushima was later identified as Kazuo Nakamura, who was    drafted during his training at Eiheiji in 1938, and who became abbot of Unshoji, Showa-mura, Tone-gun, Gunma-ken after returning from Burma. He wrote the novel The Burmese Earrings under the pen name Kazuo Musha, visiting Burma often and donating for a primary school. He passed away on December 17, 2008 at age 92.

https://ja.wikipedia.org/wiki/%E3%83%93%E3%83%AB%E3%83%9E%E3%81%AE%E7%AB%AA%E7%90%B4

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Burmese_Harp_(1956_film)

  1. Dharma Teaching by Essay ~ Heart Warming Buddhism “One Tan Silk”

Rev. Daigaku Sakai, abbot at Sotoshu Chotoku-ji in Gunma-ken, nephew of Nakamura’s predecessor, noted the story Nakamura told at his temple or the high school he worked for:

When a soldier found a heap of silk bundles in the basement of a Pagoda, donations from the Buddhist followers, where they stayed to avoid the rain for a week, they took many (five, even ten) tans of them to exchange for food in the city where they were headed. I put only one in my backpack. Those who took more silk died one by one on the mountain path to Mudon, a journey of more than a hundred miles. (Tan is a unit of fabric: one tan is about 10 x 1/3 metersf, or enough to make one a person’s kimono clothes.)

Rev. Sakai commented that “desireless contentment,” the first of the Ten Awakened One’s Awarenesses, saved the Nakamura’s life.

http://emuzu-2.cocolog-nifty.com/blog/2010/02/post-d5c5.html

随筆説法~心があったまる仏教 “一反の絹”
群馬・曹洞宗長徳寺住職 酒井大岳

Mankind’s madness (Triple Poisons) is the cause of MAD maniacism in the karma way and world. The Burmese Harp’s ending caption “The earth of Burma is red; the rocks are also red” seems to suggest blood spilt over the earth hinting also the red ruby, spirit. The Buddha said, “The world is ablaze. The eyes are ablaze. The ears…nose…tongue…body…mind…ablaze.” How can we cease fire engulfing the earth and blood-shedding and tear-shedding, which are more than oceans – as the Buddha said?

 

DSC03328

 

 

 

 

 

DSC03330

 

 

 

 

 

DSC03326

 

 

 

 

 

Posted in Asankhata (asamskrita: unmade), War, Wholly Wholesome Way/World | Leave a comment

PILGRIMAGE: CAMINO PRIMITIVO, DAY 13, SAN ROMÁN DE RETORTA – MELIDE

 

The beauty and solitude of the Camino Primitivo was embracing me this day with every step. In the morning, the path followed the original Roman road up a hill. Here, the mist touched the silvery leaves of young Eucalyptus trees and a distinct smell of minty pine filled the air. Although I walked alone, I felt connected with the millions of people of the past walking on this road. A magical silence surrounded me.

 

 

 

 

IMG_2355

 

 

 

 

 

IMG_2357

 

Roman road

 

 

 

 

IMG_2374

 

Hórreo

 

 

 

 

IMG_2377

 

Interesting pattern done by a spider on it’s web

 

 

 

 

IMG_2393

 

Hórreo

 

 

 

 

IMG_2404

 

Ponte Romana (Roman bridge)

The construction of an elevated path indicated that normally there is a lot of rain in  this area.

 

 

 

 

IMG_2409

 

 

 

 

 

IMG_2419

 

Water fountain with statue of St. James

 

 

 

 

 

IMG_2423

 

Cemetery with many crosses in order to ward off evil spirits

 

 

 

On my path today, I passed many Corredoiras (hamlets). The area was extremely poor and often the old granite houses were abandoned and deteriorating.

 

 

 

 

IMG_2415

 

 

The people I met in these very poor areas were very nice.  We always exchanged some words in Spanish and English.  The main communication was beyond words.

 

 

 

 

IMG_2436

 

Galician woman cleaning her house

 

 

 

 

 

IMG_2438

 

Galician man resting beside the path

 

 

 

Walking up through the typical barren heathlands (elevation 2,300 ft.), the white rocks seemed to touch the sky.

 

 

 

 

IMG_2446

 

 

 

One stone house was especially charming.  Nobody was at home and I decided to take a rest on the wooden bench in front of the house.  The fragrance of the pink roses, the humming of the bees and the little kittens, which appeared around the corner and played with each other, made this an especially peaceful place.  It was hard to leave.

 

 

 

 

IMG_2452

 

 

 

 

 

IMG_2458

 

Stick beside the bench with ribbons and words

 

 

 

 

IMG_2466

 

Hórreo

By arriving in Melide, the Camino Primitivo was merging with the Camino Fránces and the Camino de la Costa.  Many pilgrims stayed overnight in this town. I knew thistown from my pilgrimage five years ago, when I walked the Camino Fránces with my daughter Anna-Sophie.

 

 

 

 

 

Posted in Camino Primitivo, Pilgrimage | Leave a comment

Attaining Awakening and Avoiding Annihilation

 

 

Good morning!

 

After sittings and service we are in the quiet, calm, and clear world. This is the time,

with events all over the world, that we reflect on the end of WWII with the first

A-bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki. Nukes present the most imminent possibility

of global holocaust, with about two thousand war-heads at hair-trigger alert aimed

at cities and centers in the US, Russia, and other countries totaling 16,000 bombs.

The inevitable global catastrophe includes global warming and mass extinction, if

we continue business as usual.

 

The Buddha foresaw the end of the world due to the Triple Poisons of desire, divisive-

ness, and delusion derived from human karmas, and he provided us with the solution

for it. This sitting is the exactly the way to still karmas, see the Dharma (Norm/Law)

of all dharmas (forms/phenomena), serve all, and save all beings. Dogen said that

awakening is not attained with the mind, but with the body. Enlightenment is not

ideas or intellectual understanding, but witnessing nirvana, cessation of the karma

wind where awakening dawns.

 

As I mentioned the other day, an NHK special program had featured how animals

developed eyes, borrowing plant sensor genes. Another one showed how mammals

shifted from egg laying to fetus carrying and baby nursing, which promoted the

mother-baby bond . The third, on the mammalian revolution, discussed the evolution

of intellect through brain enlargement, sense integration, and especially communica-

tion through language development. It is possible that these attributes distinguished

homo sapiens from the Neanderthal.

 

Sight, heart, and mind, however, can be misused by the Triple Poisons, especially by

the delusion of the separate Self. The far-sight by eye-sight in standing and sense-

extension with tools is unique, but we must have a true insight into karmas with

prognosis. The heart-mind must meet this and master holiness (wholesome whole).

The head, heart, hara (guts), body, bacteria, bio-spheres, etc. must meet the holy

Dharma world, the body stilled and settled in nirvana, seeing from the supra-

mundane, karma-less truth, saving all.

 

8/9/15

 

Note:

  1. The secretion of liquid to prevent laid eggs from bacteria with milk-like thing over skin developed more milk secretion with more specialized organ to feed newly born babies.

2.The holy Dharma (Truth/Law) world is the natural interdependent life system of      dharmas (phenomena in the Dharma of Dependent Origination) evolved through  time and space since the Big Bang as illustrated by the Indra-net, whose crystal balls  (dharmas) reflect each other limitlessly.  Against this the human species has been building an artificial uni-directional pyramidal systemk, struggling for matter and  power with the fivefold calamities of delusion, bondage, discrimination, exploitation,and extermination. Religions aim at reunion (Latin religare means re-union) with holiness (wholly wholesomeness) from sin (separation sickness) with the fivefold blisses of awakening, freedom, equality, love, and peace on different levels (as tribal, national, world, universal religions).

 

 

 

 

 

DSC03312

 

 

 

 

 

 

DSC03314

 

 

 

 

 

 

DSC03315

 

 

 

 

 

 

DSC03316

 

 

 

 

 

 

DSC03317

 

 

 

 

 

 

DSC03321

 

 

 

 

 

 

DSC03322

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Posted in Awakened Way (Buddhism), Holy: wholly wholesome: undefiled (vs. sinful: separated: selfish | Leave a comment

PILGRIMAGE: CAMINO PRIMITIVE, DAY 12, LUGO – SAN ROMÁN DA RETORTA

 

Leaving the town through the Puerta de Santiago, the way leads to a Roman bridge over the river Miño and follows most of the time the Roman road.  Unfortunately, it is an asphalt street now.

 

 

 

 

IMG_2303

 

Roman bridge over the river Miño

 

 

 

 

IMG_2309

 

A peregrino filling his water bottle at a fountain

 

 

 

 

IMG_2315

 

A backpack and a carryon at the same time – with the many asphalt roads, it makes even a little sense……

 

 

 

 

 

IMG_2333

 

 

 

 

 

IMG_2331

 

 

 

 

In Galicia, there are crosses everywhere. Every hórreo (granary) has a cross on the roof.  Crosses were used to ward off evil spirits.

 

 

 

 

IMG_2343

 

One other interesting remnant of the Roman times is a Roman road marker.

 

 

 

 

IMG_2344

 

 

 

 

 

IMG_2346

 

 

 

 

 

IMG_2348

 

San Roman de Retorta (12th century)

 

 

 

Unfortunately, my right knee started to hurt this day and I was happy to find a place to sleep in the albergue San Román da Retorta.  Most of my pilgrim friends went to the next albergue, Ferreira de Negral, .

 

 

 

 

IMG_2339

 

Taberna Don Jaime with a hórreo

 

 

 

Posted in Camino Primitivo, Pilgrimage | Leave a comment