Pilgrimage to Santiago de Compostela: Days 33 – 34

 

 

 

DAY THIRTYTHREE and THIRTYFOUR

BAZAS  -  CAPTIEUX  - ROQUEFORT

 

 

Lass dir alles geschehen: Schönheit und Schrecken.

Man muss nur gehen: Kein Gefühl ist das fernste.

Lass dich von mir nicht trennen.

Nah ist das Land

das sie Leben nennen..

Rainer Maria Rilke

Let it all happen to you: beauty and dread. Just walk – no feeling is too far.

Do not let yourself be disconnected from me. Very close is  the land they call life.

 

 

The two days of hiking were miles and miles and miles straight to the west on a

former railroad track through a dense forest with hardly any villages in between.

The singing of the birds, the sounds of the cicadas and the whispering of the wind

in the treetops were the only sounds going with me.  Several feet high ferns were

growing in between oak and pine trees where the sunlight was making interesting

patterns of light and shade.

 

 

 

 

IMG_9088 (1)

 

 

 

The seemingly endless way to the west reminded me of a saying of Rosenblum Roshi.

He compared our life as being on a railroad track with no beginning or end.  In

reality, he said, there is nobody in front or in the back of you.  Everything is relative.

 

 

 

IMG_9094

 

 

 

The pathway was leading over and under bridges and sometimes the golden yellow

heads of little chanterelles where peaking out of a dense layer of dry oak leaves on

the ground.

 

 

 

IMG_9082

 

 

 

 

 

 

IMG_9084

 

 

In the many hours of walk with not much change of scenery, my mind wanted to be

more active.  Therefore, I started to memorize one of my favorite Rilke poems. Just

walking, breathing, listening to the sounds of nature, feeling the warm air in my face

and the words of the poem filled me with great joy.

 

 

 

 

IMG_9113

 

Chanterelle covered by oak leaves

 

 

In Captieux, I stayed at the Syndicat d’initiative run by the city.  It was a little house

that was newly renovated inside.  After cleaning it a bit, I felt very comfortable.  I

used some of the nettles growing outside for making nettle tea.

 

 

 

 

IMG_9100

 

Terrace of the refuge

 

 

The next day was another day of walking on the former railroad tracks for 23 miles.

Since Captieux, I was in the region of Les Landes. Until the 19th century, this area

was very dangerous to walk through, as the soil consists of white, loose sand, which

became a dangerous swampland during heavy rain.  Napoleon III ordered pine trees

to be planted.  Now Les Landes is one of the biggest forest areas in Europe.

 

 

 

 

IMG_9106

 

 

Sometimes, young kids were riding motorcycles on the straight roads with high

speeds.

 

 

 

 

IMG_9127 (1)

 

 

 

Pigeon hunting and looking for mushrooms are two favorite things people like to do

in Les Landes.  Luckily, I only met mushroom hunters. The mushrooms were not

only plentiful, but also gigantic.

 

 

IMG_9144

 

 

In the middle of nowhere, a little 12th century chapel suddenly appeared. For the

pilgrims in the Middle Ages, this chapel was for sure a great relief.

 

 

 

 

IMG_9145 (1)

 

Chapelle Notre-Dame de Lugaut

 

 

I had to pick up the key for the refuge in Roquefort at a bar.  I was the only one

staying overnight in the big house.  A plate of fruit on the dining room table and

flowers on each nightstand showed that the people really cared for this place.

I loved the medieval character of the town.

 

 

 

 

IMG_9170 (1)

 

View to the 12th century church Église Notre Dame de l’Assomption

 

 

 

Many people before me stayed overnight at the refuge.  To my joy, I discovered in the

pilgrim’s book the inscription of Emeline, the woman I met on the second day in

Saint Reverien.  Several days ago, she was at the same refuge.

 

 

 

IMG_9166 (1)

 

 

 

 

 

- Text and photos contributed by Garyo -

 

 

 

 

 

 

Posted in Pilgrimage | Leave a comment

Pilgrimage to Santiago de Compostela: Day 32

 

 

 

 

DAY THIRTYTWO

LA-FERME  -  BAZAS

 

 

Without opening your door

You can open your heart

Without looking out your window

You can see the essence of Tao.

                                                            Lao Tse

 

 

At 9 in the morning we were starting for Cadillac, a town 19 miles west from La-

Ferme. Here we found out that the pilgrim’s way was no longer going through this

town.  My guidebook, published 2012, had not recorded this change.  In total, Jean

Paul drove over two hours to drop me off on the marked way. His generosity and

helpfulness were amazing.

 

It was a beautiful walk to Bazas. The rain filled the air with a heavy dampness and

put a great stillness over the meadows and fields. It was just great to walk, to breath,

to be.

 

 

 

IMG_9020

 

 

 

 

 

IMG_9016 (1)

 

 

 

 

IMG_9024

 

 

I entered Bazas through the old city gate and came soon to a very picturesque city

plaza with the 13th century Gothic church Cathédral Saint-Jean-Baptiste. Instead of

statues, little children were sitting in the niches of the entrance to the church.  I loved

the replacement of the former statues with happy children.  When I entered the

church, I saw high up in the apsis of the church, standing on scaffolding, a man

renovating the heart shaped stained glass window frame.  I was touched by the magic

of this site.

 

 

 

 

IMG_9034

 

City gate of Bazas

 

 

 

 

IMG_9054

 

City plaza of Bazas with the Gothic church

 

 

 

 

IMG_9047

 

    Children climbing up to the niches of the entrance to the church

 

 

 

 

IMG_9037

 

                      Stained glass window in the apsis of the church facing east

 

 

 

 

IMG_9057

 

Gothic arcades at the plaza of Bazar

 

 

After having a Bhoudi tea in the café under the Gothic arcades, I walked to the

refuge, the Château Saint-Vincent owned by Madame and Monsieur Dumortier.

They bought this Château for their retirement days. He was a professional carpenter

and she is an artist.  Both love to renovate.  This Château gives them plenty to do.

 

 

 

 

IMG_9059 (1)

 

Château Saint-Vincent

 

 

 

 

IMG_9063 (1)

 

Madame and Monsieur Dumortier in the kitchen

Text and photos contributed by Garyo -

 

 

 

 

Posted in Pilgrimage | Leave a comment

Pilgrimage to Santiago de Compostela: Day 31

 

 

 

DAY THIRTYONE

PORT-SAINTE-FOY-ET-PONCHAT  -  SAINT-FERME

 

 

 

When I crossed the river Dordogne, I entered the area of Bordeaux.  Very soon, I was

surrounded by seemingly endless rows of vineyards.  There was not much else

growing. Every little flower I met on the way was joy for me.

 

 

 

 

IMG_8932

 

 

 

 

 

IMG_8928

 

 

 

 

 

IMG_8922

 

Chicory 

 

 

 

 

IMG_8920

 

Small succulents

 

 

 

At one point, I could not find the shell sign and asked a construction worker about

the Way.  He was an Englishman by the name of Kevin who lived and worked in

France.  He offered to help me find the way again.  It turned out that I was on the

right Way all along, but he gave me a ride for several Kilometers up a hill. I was very

thankful for that.

 

 

 

 

IMG_8914

 

Kevin giving me a ride

 

 

 

Nevertheless, the day was a day of walking many, many miles on hard asphalt streets,

up and down hills with vineyard after vineyard. My legs were swollen and cramped

and the body was revolting – and I still had 180 miles to go.  I decided to listen to the

body and stop my pilgrimage. The next day, in Reole, I would take a train to Paris

and go back to Vienna.

 

 

 

 

 

IMG_8955

 

Miles of asphalt streets straight to the west

 

 

In the evening I arrived in the refuge of La-Ferme.  Jean Paul, the hospitaliér, was

already expecting me.

 

I was the only pilgrim there.  When I told him about the plan to stop my pilgrimage,

he convinced me to go on. The next day he would take me 20 miles westwards with

his car so I could walk in a more relaxed speed.  The dinner he cooked was fabulous–

vegetable soup, potato gratin and yogurt with raspberry sauce.

 

Later on, I even got a tour of the former monastery by a native with the name of Jean

Claude.  In French, he told me enthusiastically about the history of this place and

I could hardly understand him.  But this really did not matter.

 

 

 

 

IMG_8965

 

 La-Ferme,  former Benedictine Monastery, 12th century

 

 

The acoustics were fantastic in the church.  Jean Claude asked me to sing a song

and I was surprised how my voice filled out the whole space.

 

 

 

IMG_8998

 

Inside the church

 

 

 

 

IMG_8963

 

Jean Paul in the refuge “Voie de Vezelay”

Text and photos contributed by Garyo -

Posted in Pilgrimage | Leave a comment

Pilgrimage to Santiago de Compostela: Day 30

 

 

 

DAY THIRTY

MUSSIDAN -  PORT-SAINTE-FOY-ET-PONTCHAPT

 

 

Even in the heavenly desires

One does not attain joy

Hearers of the rightly awakened

Enjoy extinction of desire.

                                                        Dhammapada

 

 

At 6 in the morning, the honking of two cars, loud voices and the overloud beat of

music speakers of the cars woke me up.  I had enjoyed my solitude of the last couple

of weeks so much that this noise was incredible disturbing…………

 

Again, I had to walk 33 km (20 miles) this day. I needed to make the distance to

arrive at Saint-Jean-Pied-de Port latest by July 19 so I could be back in Austria

for my husband’s birthday.

 

The Way was leading me through meadows and oak forests and later on to a totally

different environment – to vineyards stretching up to the horizon.  By coming closer

to Spain, the churches also changed to show Spanish influences on their facades.

 

 

 

 

IMG_8849

 

 

Long walks on asphalt streets caused my leg muscles to cramp and it was the first

time that I took the medicine Alive in order to be able to continue walking.  My

doubts about the continuation of the Way grew stronger and stronger. At the same

time, I was thinking about the millions of people having walked this way over

centuries and they had to overcome bigger hassles than just a pain in the leg.

 

 

 

 

IMG_8854 (1)

 

Sign of the Way with a marching pilgrim

                                                    

 

 

 

IMG_8865

 

Watch tower 

 

 

 

 

IMG_8866

 

View down the valley of the Dordogne River

 

 

The Dordogne River separated the two towns, Port-Sainte-Foye-et-Ponchapt and

Sainte-Foy-la-Grande. The refuge where I stayed overnight was in the first town.

It was a big house with 10 beds and I was the only pilgrim in this place. This was

a strange feeling. Like always, I signed my name into the Golden Book, the Book of

pilgrims.

 

IMG_8872

 

Dordogne river and the town Sainte-Foy-la Grande

 

 

 

 

IMG_8900 (1)

 

Medieval walkways in the town Saint-Foy

 

 

 

IMG_8888

Pilgrim’s Book

- Text and photos contributed by Garyo -

Posted in Pilgrimage | Leave a comment

Pilgrimage to Santiago de Compostela: Day 29

 

 

 

DAY TWENTYNINE

CHÂTEAU PUY-FERRAT – MUSSIDAN

 

 

For the one who has completed the journey

and sorrowless,

liberated from all,

For the one who has discarded all fetters,

burning tortures occur no more

                                                            Dhammapada

 

 

Before I left Puy-Ferrat the next morning, a group of French pilgrims were singing

pilgrim’s song in the breakfast room of the Château.  It was a nice start of the day.

By walking through a Hameau -a small village - I met a very nice woman and had a

chat with her.

 

 

 

 

IMG_8762

 

 

 

 

 

 

IMG_8767

 

 

Soon after that meeting, I began a long, long walk through a huge forest area.

The way was marked badly and sometimes there was no sign of the shell visible for

long stretches.  Nobody was around to ask if the way was correct.  It was an

exhausting hike.

 

 

 

 

IMG_8785

 

 

 

 

 

 

IMG_8784

 

                     Taking a rest on a hunter’s high seat

 

 

In the village of Sourzac,  I visited an exhibition of ecclesiastical, liturgical robes for

Catholic priests.  A local woman, who once worked for a famous fashion house in

Paris, renovated these dalmatics.

 

 

 

 

 

IMG_8795

View of the village Sourzac from the town Saint-Louis–en-I’sle

 

 

 

 

IMG_8799 (2)

 

Exhibition of Dalmatics

 

 

When I arrived in the town Mussidan  - after having been nine hours on the road -

the refuge was closed and nobody answered the phone.  I had to stay in a hotel, the

Grand hotel of the town.  When I entered the hotel, a soccer game was broadcasted

with overloud speakers; only one guest watched the game. I was the only guest who

stayed overnight.  It was the first time that I felt lonely on my pilgrimage. I missed

the warm welcome of the hospitaliérs, the volunteers of the refuges, and the whole

spirit of the Way.  But the nice dinner I prepared for myself - avocado, baguette,

cheese and a tartelette aux fraises (a strawberry cake) – was a real treat.

 

 

 

 

IMG_8820

 

 

 

 

Text and photos contributed by Garyo -

Posted in Pilgrimage | Leave a comment

Pilgrimage to Santiago de Compostela: Day 28

DAY TWENTYEIGHT

PÉRIGUEUX – SAINT –ASTIER

 

 

     Just simply alive      

     Both of us, I      

     And the poppy                                    

                                        Issa

I decided to continue the Way. There was something bigger than myself, bigger than

my frustration of getting lost, bigger than the hurtful feet – it was something, which

carried me forward, some inner energy, which did not want to stop.

 

 

 

 

IMG_8579

 

           Leaving the refuge in rue Gambetta /Périgueux

 

 

It took me more than one hour, through sheer endless rows of houses, to get out of

the city. Strong rain and wind were with me all the morning. The rain was so heavy

that forest roads turned into little lakes and muddy paths.

 

 

 

IMG_8582

 

               Part of the Benedictine Abbey Chancelade

 

 

 

 

IMG_8598

 

 

                                Forest path full of water

 

 

 

 

 

 

IMG_8607 (1)

 

                       Sign forbidding mushroom picking

 

 

In the little town of Gravelle, I stopped for a coffee and met a young woman with the

name Maude.  She was a pilgrim too.  She told me that she had slept in the forest.

She looked unkempt, disorderly and was constantly smoking. I felt uncomfortable

with her.  Later on, I realized my aversion and regretted not having talked with her

more.  I hoped to meet her again.

 

 

 

 

IMG_8603

 

                                           River Isle with mill

 

 

When I arrived at the Château Puy-Ferrat, the sun was out again.  The Chateau was

also a pilgrim’s refuge and I decided to stay overnight.  Here I met Maude again.

We shared the same room and had good conversations.  I was happy to not have

given in to my first impression.

 

 

 

IMG_8704

 

                         15th century Château Puy-Ferrat

 

 

 

IMG_8712

 

Front side of Château Puy-Ferrat

 

 

 

The Château was a fantastic place. Everything was open and free to look at - from the

cellar to the attic.  Many things were original – like the 15th century roof

construction. The wall walk under the roof was totally intact.  One could walk

around the entire castle.

 

 

 

IMG_8612

 

                          One of the rooms of the castle

 

 

 

 

IMG_8658

 

                              Part of the original Wall Walk

 

 

 

 

IMG_8638

 

                                  15th century roof construction

 

 

Since 1999, Pierre Marzart has owned this place and mainly rents it for weddings.

But he also provides rooms for tourists and pilgrims. The price pilgrims pay to stay

overnight is incredible cheap. He told me that the 250 acres of land he owns he gave

to his friend for use, free of charge. I was impressed by his generosity.

 

 

 

 

IMG_8621

 

                      Pierre stamping the pilgrim’s pass

 

 

I also was impressed by the poetic chaos I found on the property of the Château.

This place was alive.

 

 

 

 

IMG_8708

 

                             Ruin in the garden of the Château

 

 

 

 

IMG_8710

 

                Little clay figure in the garden of the Château

 

 

 

IMG_8696

 

                                A peak into the derelict barn

 

 

 

 

IMG_8702

 

A statue of Christ with burning heart amongst the chaos and debris of the derelict barn.

 

 

 

Dogs, cats, chicken, geese, goats and the humans, all seemed to coexist peacefully.

 

 

 

IMG_8724

 

 

 

 

Text and photos contributed by Garyo -

Posted in Pilgrimage | Leave a comment

Pilgrimage to Santiago de Compostela: Day 27

 

 

 

DAY TWENTYSEVEN

SORGES – PÉRIGUEUX

 

 

Sorge is the capital of truffles; it even has a truffle museum.  Fenced in oak forests on

the way to Périgueux showed how valuable truffles are.

 

 

 

 

IMG_8474

 

 

 

This day, I only had fourteen miles to walk and like always, passed beautiful sites.

 

 

 

 

IMG_8469

 

 

 

 

 

IMG_8484

 

 

                                                 Draw well

 

 

In walking through the Forest “Forêt Lanmary” I discovered a castle, which seemed

to be in a deep sleep for centuries.  There was nobody around and everything was

firmly locked up.  It was a strange feeling peeking into the past with no life anymore

in it.

 

 

 

 

IMG_8506

 

 

 

When I arrived in the city of Perigueux, which has approximately 30,000

inhabitants, the difference between past and present was amazing.  There were so

many tourists visiting this town. The historical sites of Perigueux reach back to

Gallo-Roman times.  The most fascinating monument of the past for me was the

temple of the Gallic goddess “Vesunna.”

 

 

 

 

 

IMG_8575 (1)

 

Temple of Vesunna

 

 

After the Romans invaded the Celtic people, they erected their own monuments and

temples.  Beside the left over of an amphitheater, other ruins of the Roman times can

be seen.

 

 

 

IMG_8520

 

                             Remains of a Roman temple

 

 

During the peak of the pilgrimage to Santiago, Perigueux became a famous

pilgrimage town.  Two churches speak about this time – the 12th century

Cathédral Saint-Front and the even older church Eglise Saint-Etienne de la Cité.

In visiting the Church Saint-Etienne, I felt very uncomfortable.  It was dark

and dreary; even the organ music did not change this feeling.

 

 

 

 

IMG_8539

 

                              Église Saint-Etienne de la Cité

 

 

The Cathedral Saint-Front reminded me of St. Marcus in Venice and the Hagia

Sophia in Istanbul.  It had a Byzantine influence; its space was enormous.  But,

somehow, my enthusiasm for historical buildings had vanished that day. Not even

the cheery whiteness of the town – all the buildings and streets were built of the

local white limestone – lifted my spirits. It was my last day with Rohan and Eddy

and I felt somehow exhausted from the many days of walking. Just before I arrived

Perigueux, I got lost again and had to walk 3 extra miles on a busy road.  I was

considering the idea of stopping all together and, instead, visiting Thich Nhat Hanh’s

Plum Village, which was not far from Perigueux.

 

 

 

 

P1110827

 

                Side entrance of the Cathedral Saint-Front

 

 

 

 

P1110828 (1)

 

                 Main entrance to the Cathedral Saint-Front

 

 

 

 

P1110837

 

                         One of many street cafes in Perigueux

 

 

-Text and photos contributed by Garyo -

 

 

 

Posted in Pilgrimage | Leave a comment

Pilgrimage to Santiago de Compostela: Day 26

 

 

 

DAY TWENTYSIX

LA COQUILLE – SORGES

 

 

     An ancient path

     a frog jumps in

     the splash of water

                                           Basho

 

 

Since Châlus, I was in the region of Périgord, a district divided into four areas, each

identified with the four colors white, black, red and green. The part I was walking

through was the Périgord verd (green) because of its abundant vegetation.

 

For lunch I stopped in Thivier.  Jean-Paul-Sartre lived in this town until he was six

years old.  He had only bad memories about this place. He described his experience

in his book “Les Mots” (the words).

 

 

 

 

IMG_8361

 

                Thivier seen from the place I had lunch

 

 

In Thivier, I had to make a decision – either choose the shorter route to Sorges on

the Road Napoleon, a straight road Napoleon ordered to be built for the military, or

walk the traditional route, which is longer and nicer.  I decided to walk the traditional

way. Although I was exhausted at the end of the day – having walked 21 miles - I did

not regret it.

 

 

 

 

IMG_8386

 

                                    Quiet forest roads

 

 

 

 

IMG_8387

 

                                    Meadows with poppies

 

 

 

 

IMG_8400

 

                                    Fields of sunflowers

 

 

 

 

IMG_8390

 

                                             Vinyards

 

 

When I arrived at the refuge in Sorges, Eddy and Rohan were already there.  They

took the Route Napoleon.  Anna-Marie, a volunteer from Paris, managed the refuge.

She cooked a delicious meal for us.  The Andalusian Paella was especially delicious.

 

 

 

 

IMG_8446

 

            Anna-Marie in the kitchen of the refuge                                                                    with Rohan and Eddy

 

 

 

 

IMG_8450

 

                         Andalusian Paella, a rice dish

 

 

The church was also a special treat. Modern light installations and excellent

renovation techniques made it to a very special place

 

 

 

 

P1110623

 

                                     Church of Sorges

 

 

 

 

IMG_8440

 

                         Interior of the church in Sorges

 

 

 

- Text and photos contributed by Garyo -

 

 

 

Posted in Pilgrimage | Leave a comment

Pilgrimage to Santiago de Compostela: Day 25

 

 

 

DAY TWENTYFIVE

FLAVIGNAC- LA COQUILLE

 

 

For the one with the mind

not flowing out, the thoughts

not scattered, right and wrong

discarded, and wakeful,

there is no fear

                                                  Dhammapada

 

 

This day was a day of walking through meadows, forests and fields. Quiet lakes were

scattered in between with trees being reflected on the surface.  It was great just to

walk.

 

 

 

 

IMG_8230 (1)

 

 

 

 

 

IMG_8246

 

 

 

 

 

IMG_8333

 

 

 

In front of a cherry tree, the owner of the house placed a chair for the hikers with

the invitation to use it for rest.

 

 

 

 

IMG_8262

 

 

 

 

 

IMG_8261

 

      Hikers, you have earned a rest

 

 

Around noon, I arrived in the charming little town, Châlus, where the English king

Richard Lionheart died during a battle over the castle in 1199.  This was a big

surprise for me. Not only was I following the footsteps of Richard Lionheart by

starting my pilgrimage in Vezelay, but also, an Austrian Duke captured Richard

Lionheart when he passed Vienna and put him into prison in the castle of Dürnstein,

near where I am from.   There was a connection between the past and the present.

 

 

 

 

IMG_8266

 

    Town of Châlus with the road up to the castle

 

 

When I walked up to the castle, its big entrance door was locked.  I did not see any

way to visit the place.  Suddenly, a girl came with a key.  She was the tour guide of the

castle and opened the place for the first time in the season.  Her name was Charlotte

and she gave me a tour.

 

 

 

 

IMG_8269

 

Charlotte opening the door

 

 

 

IMG_8310 (1)

 

      Former castle of Châlus

 

 

 

After King Lionheart’s death -as it was common practice for the aristocracy during

the Middle Ages - his body was divided up. His entrails were buried in the castle of

Châlus, his embalmed heart in the Cathedral of Notre Dame in Rouen, and the rest

of his body was buried in the Fontevraud Abbey beside his father.

 

 

 

 

IMG_8283

 

On the ground to the right of the walk way, The lying statue of Richard Lionheart.

 

 

 

After I left the town, my mind was occupied with the story of Richard Lionheart and

the chain of events, which lead to his early death. At one point on the Way, I had to

decide if I wanted to ignore the local signs of forbidding me to enter a clearly marked

way of the pilgrimage or not.  It was very confusing. I decided to follow the shell –

and really got lost. It was an old sign nobody had removed. At the end, I reached the

common Way again, but with a big detour.  It was nice that Eddy and Rohan called to

find out where I was. I arrived in La Coquille in late afternoon. La Coquille means

shell in French.

 

 

 

 

IMG_8338

 

         The blocked Way I ignored.

 

 

 

- Text and photos contributed by Garyo -

 

 

 

Posted in Pilgrimage | Leave a comment

Pilgrimage to Santiago de Compostela: Day 24

 

 

 

DAY TWENTYFOUR

LIMOGES – FLAVIGNAC

 

 

      Cool breeze

      tangled

      in a grass blade

                                    Issa

 

 

As I walked out of the town of Limoge, I passed the marketplace, the old train station

and the Église Saint-Michel-des Lions, a 14th century Gothic hall church.

By entering the church, I was welcomed by the warm light and air of uncountable

burning candles and the smell of incense. Dim morning light was falling through the

huge stained glass windows. The space was magical.  I learned that the 3rd century

Roman Saint Martial is buried here.  He brought Christianity to the Roman town,

then called Augustoritum.

 

 

 

 

IMG_8134

 

                              Église Saint-Michel-des-Lions

 

 

It took me two hours to leave the city.  Allies of oak trees were walking with me.

Later on, there were hardly any villages along the way.  In the little town Aixe-sur-

Vienne, I visited the workshop of a basket maker. A painting on a wooden door

shows that it is still 1,349 km (838 miles) to Santiago de Compostela.

 

 

 

 

IMG_8168

 

                              Workshop of the basketmaker

 

 

In the refuge of Flavignac, I met Rohan and Eddy again.  They did the typical errands

of the pilgrims at the end of each day – washing laundry, caring for the feet and

writing a diary.

 

 

 

 

IMG_8220

 

   Rohan and Eddy writing the diary in front of the refuge

 

 

The village of Flavignac has not only a restaurant and a boulangerie but also a tiny

delicatesse grocery store, which is at the same time a café and a photo studio and a

book store.

 

 

 

 

IMG_8204

 

                      Proud owner with family of the Épicerie

 

 

- Text and photos contributed by Garyo -

 

 

 

 

Posted in Pilgrimage | Leave a comment